Podcast Episode 145 – Powerhouse Literary Agent to the Stars, Jonathan Lomma

There was a time when I thought about being an agent.  I interviewed with the big three-lettered agencies and was even offered a couple of gigs.  But I didn’t take them.

Because I didn’t have the stamina to sit behind one of those desks for 5+ years before I could agent myself.

You know who did have that stamina and guts?  Today’s guest, Mr. Jonathan Lomma.

Jonathan heard about agenting early on, and whether he knew it or not, he put himself on a path, which he fulfilled, of representing legends like Terrence McNally, Arthur Laurents, and Edward Albee.

We talked about what it was like working with such major writers like the triple-play above, as well as:

  • What made him go to law school even though he was a child actor.
  • Jonathan’s theory of how musicals changed after 2001.
  • How an emerging writer gets on his radar.
  • His favorite quote about working closely with people on the “other side” of the table.
  • And more.

Within five seconds of meeting Jonathan, you just know that he found his calling.  Being an agent is exactly what he is supposed to do.

And after five seconds of listening to this podcast, you’ll realize that Jonathan isn’t just an agent for his clients.  He’s an agent for the theater.  And we’re lucky to have him as an advocate.

Enjoy!

Click here for the link to my podcast with Jonathan!

Listen to it on iTunes here. (And if you like the podcast, give it a great review, while you’re there!)

Download it here.

 

Podcast Episode 145 – Jonathan Lomma

 

There was a time when I thought about being an agent.  I interviewed with the big three-lettered agencies and was even offered a couple of gigs.  But I didn’t take them.

Because I didn’t have the stamina to sit behind one of those desks for 5+ years before I could agent myself.

You know who did have that stamina and guts?  Today’s guest, Mr. Jonathan Lomma.

Jonathan heard about agenting early on, and whether he knew it or not, he put himself on a path, which he fulfilled, of representing legends like Terrence McNally, Arthur Laurents, and Edward Albee.

We talked about what it was like working with such major writers like the triple-play above, as well as:

  • What made him go to law school even though he was a child actor.
  • Jonathan’s theory of how musicals changed after 2001.
  • How an emerging writer gets on his radar.
  • His favorite quote about working closely with people on the “other side” of the table.
  • And more.

Within five seconds of meeting Jonathan, you just know that he found his calling.  Being an agent is exactly what he is supposed to do.

And after five seconds of listening to this podcast, you’ll realize that Jonathan isn’t just an agent for his clients.  He’s an agent for the theater.  And we’re lucky to have him as an advocate.

Enjoy!

Click above to listen to my podcast with Jonathan!

Listen to it on iTunes here. (And if you like the podcast, give it a great review, while you’re there!)

Download it here.

The Demographics of the Broadway Audience 2018-2019

One of the many great services of the Broadway League is the demographic survey they do of our audience.

It’s essential for any industry or business to find out who its customers are in order to . . .

  1. Tailor our marketing dollars towards the people who are coming to make our advertising more efficient.
  2. Find out who is NOT coming, so we can make concerted efforts to get them TO come.

The future of our industry and our art depends on the above, which is why these surveys are so important, and why I summarize them for you here.

Here are the top-level bullet points from this year’s demographic survey of the Broadway Audience:

  • In the 2018–2019 season, Broadway shows welcomed 14.8 million admissions, an all-time high.
  • Approximately 35% of those attendances were by people from the New York City metropolitan area.
  • Sixty-five percent of admissions were made by tourists: 46% from the United States (but outside New York City and its suburbs) and 19% from other countries.
  • This represents the highest number of attendances by foreign visitors in history— 2.8 million.
  • Sixty-eight percent of the audiences were female.
  • The average age of the Broadway theatregoer was 42.3 years old. This average has hovered between 40 and 45 years old for the past two decades.
  • Along with the overall growth in attendance, the number of admissions by non-Caucasian theatregoers reached a record high of 3.8 million.
  • Of theatregoers age 25 or older, 81% had completed college and 41% had earned a graduate degree.
  • The average annual household income of the Broadway theatregoer was $261,000.
  • The average number of attendances by the Broadway theatregoer was 4.4 in the past year. The group of devoted fans who attended 15 or more performances comprised only 5% of the audience, but accounted for 28% of all tickets (4.15 million admissions).
  • Playgoers tended to be more frequent theatregoers than musical attendees. The typical straight-play attendee saw seven shows in the past year; the musical attendee, four.
  • Respondents reported having paid an average of $145.60 per ticket.
  • Fifty-nine percent of respondents said they purchased their tickets online.
  • The average reported date of ticket purchase for a Broadway show was 47 days before the performance, four days more than the previous season.
  • Google was the most common initial source theatregoers named when they were asked where they looked for information about Broadway shows. Ticketmaster and Broadway.com followed Google.
  • Twenty-two percent said that they relied primarily on word-of-mouth from people they knew.
  • Most theatregoers attended in pairs or small groups of family or friends.
  • The vast majority of current theatregoers had some connection to theatregoing as a child.

 

Want your copy of the full report (which goes into MUCH more detail than the above?  Click here.)

Broadway Grosses w/e 01/26/2020: American Utopia Rises

Broadway grosses continued to drop last week. Nearly all shows posted grosses well below the previous week. Bucking the trending, however, was American Utopia whose $205 average
ticket boosted its haul in the final three weeks of performances. Overall, grosses fell 9% from the previous week with attendance dropping just 4%.
You can find the rest of the figures below, courtesy of The Broadway League:

 

Show Name Gross  TotalAttn  %Capacity AvgPdAdm
A SOLDIER’S PLAY $328,111.00 5,009 99.25% $65.50
AIN’T TOO PROUD $1,254,912.40 10,180 89.36% $123.27
ALADDIN $1,118,994.90 13,157 95.23% $85.05
AMERICAN UTOPIA $1,180,829.00 5,766 100.00% $204.79
BEETLEJUICE $1,145,688.10 11,900 99.63% $96.28
CHICAGO $628,048.15 7,494 86.74% $83.81
COME FROM AWAY $894,079.84 8,478 101.31% $105.46
DEAR EVAN HANSEN $1,035,421.06 7,986 101.45% $129.65
FROZEN $1,001,849.00 12,659 93.97% $79.14
GRAND HORIZONS $216,238.46 4,346 92.86% $49.76
HADESTOWN $1,122,009.00 7,432 101.20% $150.97
HAMILTON $2,674,005.00 10,752 101.51% $248.70
HARRY POTTER AND THE CURSED CHILD, PARTS ONE AND TWO $1,018,786.00 12,976 100.00% $78.51
JAGGED LITTLE PILL $1,021,505.20 8,901 98.90% $114.76
MEAN GIRLS $856,636.00 9,249 94.38% $92.62
MOULIN ROUGE! $1,652,702.00 10,449 100.32% $158.17
MY NAME IS LUCY BARTON $537,802.20 4,470 98.85% $120.31
THE BOOK OF MORMON $1,021,700.80 8,083 96.50% $126.40
THE INHERITANCE $424,249.50 4,764 56.82% $89.05
THE LION KING $1,615,226.00 12,955 95.48% $124.68
THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA $773,134.20 9,868 76.85% $78.35
TINA – THE TINA TURNER MUSICAL $1,536,310.00 11,541 97.61% $133.12
TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD $1,494,086.94 11,548 100.59% $129.38
WEST SIDE STORY $1,590,210.50 13,920 100.00% $114.24
WICKED $1,469,430.50 14,296 98.89% $102.79
TOTALS $27,611,965.75 238,179 95.11% $115.39
+/- THIS WEEK LAST SEASON -2,370,414.55      
PERCENTAGE +/- THIS WEEK LAST SEASON -7.91%

Today’s blog was guest-written by Ryan Conway, President of Architect Theatrical. Find out more here!

Broadway Grosses w/e 01/12/2020: Broadway still in hibernation

While the weather was trying to tell us otherwise last weekend, it’s certainly still January on Broadway. Grosses fell a steep 28% last week to $31M. 

Much of the drop was a result of several shows closing last week. But with 19 shows dropping six figures off their weekly gross, the rest of the winter looks grim. When’s spring break again?

You can find the rest of the figures below, courtesy of The Broadway League:

Show Name Gross  TotalAttn  %Capacity AvgPdAdm
A SOLDIER’S PLAY $305,205.00 4,901 84.97% $62.27
AIN’T TOO PROUD $1,266,884.40 10,168 89.26% $124.60
ALADDIN $1,159,820.60 13,230 95.76% $87.67
AMERICAN UTOPIA $1,106,070.00  5,764 99.97% $191.89
BEETLEJUICE $1,243,994.07 12,110 101.39% $102.72
CHICAGO $647,410.10 7,262 84.05% $89.15
COME FROM AWAY $923,883.60 8,505 101.64% $108.63
DEAR EVAN HANSEN $1,106,753.20 7,993 101.54% $138.47
FREESTYLE LOVE SUPREME $1,062,219.00 6,218 101.60% $170.83
FROZEN $1,052,392.50 12,850 95.38% $81.90
GRAND HORIZONS $213,547.32 3,473 74.21% $61.49
HADESTOWN $1,175,197.00 7,445 101.38% $157.85
HAMILTON $2,763,874.00 10,755 101.54% $256.99
HARRY POTTER AND THE CURSED CHILD, PARTS ONE AND TWO $1,153,186.00 12,976 100.00% $88.87
JAGGED LITTLE PILL $1,062,058.00 9,092 101.02% $116.81
MEAN GIRLS $890,812.60 9,292 94.82% $95.87
MOULIN ROUGE! $1,859,181.00 10,451 100.34% $177.90
MY NAME IS LUCY BARTON $478,414.40 4,365 96.53% $109.60
OKLAHOMA! $555,451.10 5,145 98.79% $107.96
SLAVE PLAY $588,514.10 6,178 97.38% $95.26
THE BOOK OF MORMON $1,097,362.50 8,332 99.47% $131.70
THE INHERITANCE $501,028.50 5,380 64.17% $93.13
THE LION KING $1,610,115.00 12,756 94.02% $126.22
THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA $801,986.02 9,112 70.97% $88.01
THE SOUND INSIDE $630,651.00 6,671 83.55% $94.54
TINA – THE TINA TURNER MUSICAL $1,572,756.00 11,679 98.77% $134.67
TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD $1,516,362.14 11,531 100.44% $131.50
WEST SIDE STORY $1,443,410.34 12,180 100.00% $118.51
WICKED $1,337,825.00 13,287 91.91% $100.69
TOTALS $31,126,364.49 259,101 93.96% $118.82
+/- THIS WEEK LAST SEASON + $592,219.42      
PERCENTAGE +/- THIS WEEK LAST SEASON + 1.94%      

Today’s blog was guest-written by Ryan Conway, President of Architect Theatrical. Find out more here!

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