The Sunday Giveaway: Two Tickets to Snapshots by Stephen Schwartz

Snapshots Goodspeed opera House Stephen SchwartzEveryone knows Stephen Schwartz wrote Wicked. And Pippin.  And Godspell.  And maybe you even know that he wrote some songs from Working.  And then there’s PocahontasThe Prince of Egypt, Enchanted and a whole lot more.

The man is a musical making machine.

Goodspeed Opera House is going even deeper into the maestro’s past and producing one of his lesser known works entitled Snapshots.  (One of my favorite things to do is take a super successful artist/author like Schwartz and look at the earlier works in their career to see the beginnings of the style that will be solidified in future projects.  A great example? See Cannibal! The Musical, written by Matt Stone and Trey Parker, and you’ll see the roots of both South Park and The Book of Mormon.)

And one of you is going to see Snapshots!

How do you win?

What lesser known work by a successful artist do you think needs a closer look?  Comment the answer below and maybe you’ll even inspire a revival. For example . . . why sure, Cy Coleman is known for Sweet Charity and City of Angels . . . but maybe you’re an even bigger fan of I Love My Wife?

Good luck!

 

(Got a comment? I love ‘em, so comment below! Email Subscribers, click here then scroll down to say what’s on your mind!)

_ _

FUN STUFF:

– Read this blog with ease on your iPhone!  Download the Producer’s Perspective app!  Click here or visit the app store!

Tags:
Comments
  • Susan says:

    Sondheim’s Anyone Can Whistle.

  • Brian says:

    Richard Greenberg’s Eastern Standard, it dealt subtly with AIDS and gentrification. It was also extremely funny.

  • Sandy says:

    Not completely unknown, but I’d love to see both TICK, TICK, BOOM and LAST FIVE YEARS get more public exposure than they do. Larson’s story is such a touching look at the identity crisis of coming-of-age, and Brown’s is just such a creatively-told complex story with a killer score. I wish more mainstream fans had the opportunity to discover these two wonderful shows.

  • brian says:

    William Finn’s In Trousers

  • God Bless You Mr. Rosewater, a musical of Alan Menkin’s based on a fun if not slightly absurd Kurt Vonegut book.

    I’m unable to find anything to hear of it!

  • Elliot says:

    Cole Porter has some beautiful lesser known shows.

  • Margie Goldsmith says:

    Time to revive Once Upon a Mattress — most kids these days have no idea what the Princess and the Pea means. That show would pull in an entire new generation of theatre-goers.

  • Bounce (aka Wise Guys) by Sondheim and Prince!

  • Andrew says:

    Sondheim’s Road Show (aka Bounce aka Wise Guys) has some beautiful moments.

  • Laurie Bloom says:

    I’m gonna go with Busker Alley by the Sherman Brothers. I remember when it was scheduled to come to Broadway in the 90’s and Tommy Tune did an awesome number from it on the Tony Awards! The cast album is wonderful and I’m still hoping it’ll be produced on Broadway in the future!

  • Brian Jones says:

    Ahrens/Flaherty/McNally’s A Man of No Importance.

  • Grace says:

    I’d also love to see TICK, TICK, BOOM revived!

  • John P. says:

    “Spencer’s Mountain,” a 1963 film formed the basis for Earl Hamner’s television series “The Waltons,” which by the way seems like an interesting subject for a musical about a young would-be writer.

  • Rafi Levavy says:

    Well, I do like I Love My Wife, but it seems cheating using that one now. But to go back to the Stephen Schwartz theme, I would be interested in seeing a live production of The Magic Show, especially with Neil Patrick Harris, a magic enthusiast who knows a thing or two about musical theater, reportedly moving to New York in about a year.

    Another thought, although slightly more known, would be Lucky Stiff, which (I believe) was Ahrens and Flaherty’s first collaboration. I would also love to see the pre-Avenue Q Kermit, Prince of Denmark.

  • I’d love to see a Diane Paulus or RSC interpretation of Sheldon Harnick’s “The Phantom Tollbooth.” This is one of the most intelligently whimsical children’s books ever, and I think theatrical invention and technology have developed to a point that would allow for some real magic and re-imagining of it on stage. Disclaimer: I have a soft spot for the story too because the author, Norton Juster, personally replied to a fan letter I wrote him in the fifth grade :)! I still have the note he sent and treasure it.

  • Laura K. says:

    First of all, I think it is interesting that Jule Styne wrote “I Don’t Want to Walk Without You” AND “I’ll Walk Alone.” Don’t you? But, a song that I think needs another look, or perhaps a show of its own, is “Just In Time.” I know it was the big number in Bells Are Ringing, but doesn’t it seem like a song needing a re-look?

    By the way, the Goodspeed is a short distance from me, and if you are in the neighborhood early, see if you can get a tour of the building. It is such a great space and a throw back to a much earlier time. It feels how theatre is supposed to feel 🙂 They do a great job there.

  • EllenFD says:

    Before THE BOOK OF MORMON, there was CANNIBAL! THE MUSICAL by then-student Trey Parker and co-starring Matt Stone. I’d love to see that little indie make it to a stage, pleasing theatergoers “hungry” for another edgy hit.

  • Rebecca S says:

    Andrew Lippa’s version of “The Wild Party.” Thankfully, my school (Carnegie Mellon Drama!) will be doing it this year, so we’ll all get to know it well 🙂

  • Gabbi Hanes says:

    Kerrigan and Lowdermilk’s Henry and Mudge. Okay, I know that sounds crazy but even if you’re not a child, it’s quite enjoyable. There are some really funny moments and songs!

  • Don Roeseke says:

    Not so much lesser known but I’d love to see Cy Coleman’s Barnum revived!

  • Susan C says:

    I’d love to see a revival of the Kander and Ebb musical revue “And The World Goes Round.” Every song is a gem!

  • nancy cohen says:

    Id like to see Herb Gardner’s Thieves which had starred Marlo Thomas and really like to see One Night Stand which he wrote with Julie Styne.

  • Andrew Beck says:

    I thought Snapshots is a NEW musical comprised of old Stephen Schwartz songs from all of his past shows BUT with a totally new book and totally new lyrics for each of the songs enabling them to fit into the context of the new book. Schwartz is doing the new lyrics and adjusting any of the songs if necessary.

  • Ellie says:

    Merrily We Roll Along!! …Or “Working” (I was just in a production of it and LOVED it!)

  • Bryan Austermann says:

    Not sure if this is really one of his lesser known works, but I’d love to see A New Brain by William Finn

  • Shakespeare’s Troilus and Cressida!

  • Dave says:

    Just to piggy-back on Don’s idea of reviving Barnum, this is going a long way back, but Rodgers and Hart had a circus musical called Jumbo in the 30s that had some great music (My Romance, Little Girl Blue, The Most Beautiful Girl In The World) that was made into a movie in the 60s. It was early in their careers, I think, and they of course both went on to much bigger things.

  • LARRY ABRAMSKY says:

    BOB MERRILL’S “THE PRINCE OF GRAND STREET”

  • scott says:

    stage version of evening primrose–great music, fun premise

  • Tim R. says:

    We all know Maury Yeston for his popular and beautiful scores of ‘Nine’, ‘Titanic’, ‘Grand Hotel’, and even the lesser known ‘Phantom’ (which truly deserves a New York production at some point). But we all forget about his lovely 10 song cycle piece ‘December Songs’, which contains some of his most beautiful music. I think its definitely time to put that back up on the stage. Maybe even flesh it out more and add in a talented book writer.

  • Kerry Zukus says:

    My favorite Sondheim musical of all time is “Merrily We Roll Along.” There, I said it! Now shoot me.

  • Lynn Manuell says:

    Cry for Us All by Mitch Leigh. This was considered “too dark” and “too soon” after the play Hogan’s Goat. I think now, after shows like Les Miz and Passion it might not seem so dark.

  • Ruth Post says:

    Speaking of Stephen Schwartz, it’s time to bring Children Of Eden to NYC. Beautiful music. I’d also love to see Working.

  • Dayna Kurnitz says:

    It is so rare to see a production of shakespeare’s “Antony and Cleopatra”. While I usually go for the musicals I would love to see someone stage this.

  • Phyllis Buchalter says:

    Frank Loesser’s “Greenwillow”!

  • Tracy Scott says:

    Would love a revival/rework of Jeanine Tesori’s “Violet”. some beautiful music and very touching story.

  • Roger Gindi says:

    Jerry Herman’s THE GRAND TOUR has a fun but meaningful story and some great songs.

  • David says:

    Me and Juliet by Rogers and Hammerstein.

  • B.J. Brooks says:

    After working as a conductor and vocal arranger on Disney’s Beauty & the Beast, Aladdin, Pocahontas, and The Hunchback of Notre Dame, and then composer for Scandalous, I’d love to see David Friedman’s earlier works like Chasing Nicolette!

  • Donald Sanborn III says:

    “Great Lady” with music by Frederick Loewe (four years before he met Alan Jay Lerner.) Like “Brigadoon,” “Great Lady” is set in the 18th century as well as the present day (in 1938).

  • Lester says:

    Do I hear A Waltz. Arthur Laurents. Richard Rodgers. Stephen Sondheim. Not A bad pedigree.

  • Emily Herschbein says:

    I know it’s recent, but I think that Bonnie & Clyde didn’t get half the attention that it deserved. Not a lot of people know of it, and some of my Broadway geeks even call it “Laura Osnes’ flop.” I love Frank Wildhorn’s music and style, and I specifically love the soundtrack of this show. I’m a big fan of Jekyll & Hyde as well as some of his more well-known others, too, but I’ll always have a soft-spot for my Bonnie & Clyde.

  • Nanda Douglas says:

    “Princesses” by Cheri and Bill Steinkellner and Matthew Wilder and David Zippel. It’s a fun show 🙂

  • Diana Lipkus says:

    I think “The Woman in White” By Andrew Lloyd Webber deserves another look and with some revisions more success.

  • Rob Del Colle says:

    A lot of people might know them from Ragtime, but My Favorite Year, by Stephen Flaherty, and Lynn Ahrens deserves a first class revival. It has probably the BEST opening number of any Broadway show. If they reworked the book a little bit this could be a big HIT!

  • Michael B says:

    “To Whom It May Concern” by Carol Hall. Saw a local production (presented in a NJ church) shortly after the success of “Best Little Whorehouse”…

  • Michael B says:

    Have also been dying to see a production of Galt MacDermot’s “The Human Comedy”

  • Randy Zeese says:

    Andrew Loyd Weber’s Sunset Boulevard …an amazing musical with soaring ballads that is rarely revived and gets no respect!

  • ALB says:

    My money’s on Charles Strouse’s “It’s a bird… it’s a plane… it’s Superman!” Some nice music, and with some rewriting, it could be both charmingly nostalgic and a tongue-in-cheek sendup of the “superhero” fascination that has taken over pop culture (and Broadway… oy!). Hire me to write your Book, Mr. Davenport, and we’ll have a hit!

  • Cara says:

    I absolutely adore Tick Tick Boom by Johnathan Larson. It’s so raw and transparent, it SCREAMS johnathan in every aspect. While many may think it’s not the best show because of this – I love that it feels like a brainstorming web of ideas and concepts that birthed a show as epic, moving, life-changing and inspiring as Rent. I have never seem it on stage anywhere and would jump at the chance!

  • Emily V says:

    High Fidelity.
    Something about it makes me always want to listen to each song more than once.

  • ECP says:

    Well, perhaps this goes beyond lesser-known to semi-forgotten, despite several still very haunting, memorable tunes. I’d like to see the Leslie Bricusse-Anthony Newley partnership reviewed. A case of peaking early? Stage STOP THE WORLD and THE ROAR OF THE GREASEPAINT Off-Broadway, in rep, maybe a site-specific presentation, with the same lead actor. Let the casting begin!

  • Mana says:

    I would love to see Mary Rodgers’ own musical adaptation of her story,”Freaky Friday”…she wrote it for Theatreworks USA in the early 90’s, I believe. The songs I have heard from it are terrific.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

SIGN UP BELOW TO NEVER MISS A BLOG

X