8 shows a what?

Does anyone know where the 8 show a week model came from?

Is it arbitrary?  Is it based on The Beatles song?  Was there any business analysis done on the actual demand for theatrical performances at the time?

My gut says that someone just picked it.  It somehow made sense at that moment, which was probably at least 50 years ago.

And thus, all of our agreements with labor unions, with landlords, etc., were based on this archaic idea that the demand for all shows, regardless of their cast or their subject matter, is the same.

So Mamma Mia does eight shows a week and so does Macbeth

That’s like Barnes and Noble stocking the same number of copies of the latest installment of Harry Potter as a Hungarian cookbook.

Smarter industries have more of a throttle on demand.  There are more flights by an airline during the holidays (and the prices go up).  There are less waiters and cooks on staff at a restaurant during a Tuesday lunch hour.

Wouldn’t it be great to find a way to break this model?  For so many shows (especially Off-Broadway), there isn’t the demand for 8 shows, but since we have to pay for them, we all do them.  And, we end up chasing our advertising tails, by spending huge bucks trying to fill the additional shows, when we could save money if we had fewer shows to fill.

And the fewer shows would be better sold, creating a harder to get ticket, which would actually increase demand as well as increase the experience for that audience (an audience of 500 is never as good as an audience of 1000).

I can hear the naysayers now:  “Ken, but there are people that want to see a show on Tuesday night, so you should capture whatever you can.”  Are you really telling me that if 2 people wanted to come to see Altar Boyz on a Tuesday, that they wouldn’t come on a Thursday if the Tuesday wasn’t available?

Two of my shows do less than 8 shows a week.  It’s a challenge to make it work with the venues, my staffs, etc. but I’m very lucky to have wonderful forward-thinking partners that make it possible. 

Yep, it’s definitely a challenge.  But I’d have a much greater challenge if they weren’t running at all.

Is there a Doctor in the theater?

From the American Heritage Dictionary:

re-vive v. tr.
1.  To bring back to life or consciousness; resuscitate.

For example, “The Doctors revived the comatose man.”

So that means if you’re reviving something, you have to consider that man, woman or musical . . . dead.

And bringing someone, something or some show back from the dead takes an awful lot. You can’t just revive anything by using  “The Secret”  or because you liked the show when you saw it 20 years ago. To have a successful revival on Broadway, you need the following:

1.  A major revisionist thinking, or a decidedly new take on the material.
2.  A major star (and not one that we’ve all seen 20 times in other shows . . . give us someone new).

And if you really want a smash revival . . . give us both.

Newton’s Laws of Motion

I. Every object in a state of uniform motion tends to remain in that state of motion unless an external force is applied to it.

II. The relationship between an object’s mass m, its acceleration a, and the applied force F is F = ma. Acceleration and force are vectors (as indicated by their symbols being displayed in slant bold font); in this law the direction of the force vector is the same as the direction of the acceleration vector.

III. For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.

Buy tickets to Private Lives on Broadway

1.151872To buy tickets to Private Lives on Broadway click the link below:

BUY PRIVATE LIVES TICKETS!

 - – – – – – – – – –

Here is the official information for Private Lives on Broadway:

About Private Lives

Considered one of the greatest comedies ever written, Noël Coward's Private Lives premiered in London in 1930 and has been produced around the world ever since; it premiered on Broadway in 1931. Glamorous, rich and reckless, Amanda and Elyot have been divorced from each other for five years. Now both are honeymooning with their new spouses in the South of France. When, by chance, they meet again across adjoining hotel balconies, their insatiable feelings for each other are immediately rekindled. They hurl themselves headlong into love and lust without a care for scandal, new partners or memories of what drove them apart in the first place…for a little while, anyway.

Starring

Kim Cattrall, Paul Gross

Running time

2 hr. 15 min. (includes 1 intermission)

Theater

 Music Box - 205 W 46th Street 

Reviews 

To read reviews of Private Lives on Broadway, click the link below:

Read Private Lives Broadway Reviews!

Buy Tickets

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Buy tickets to The Road to Mecca on Broadway

Road-to-meccaTo buy tickets to The Road to Mecca on Broadway click the link below:

BUY THE ROAD TO MECCA TICKETS!

 - – – – – – – – – –

Here is the official information for The Road to Mecca on Broadway:

About The Road to Mecca

Set in the region of South Africa known as the Karoo, Athol Fugard's The Road to Mecca tells the story of an elderly woman who has spent the years since her husband's death transforming her home into an intricate and dazzling work of art. The reclusive Miss Helen (Rosemary Harris) has become depressed and appears increasingly unable to care for herself. Pastor Marius Byleveld, who embodies the village's conservative values, is determined to get Miss Helen into an old-age home. Her friend Elsa (Carla Gugino), a young teacher from Cape Town who is deeply suspicious of the patriarchal traditions Byleveld represents, is just as determined that Miss Helen remain free.

Starring

Carla Gugino and Jim Dale  (Cast list subject to change.)

Running time

2 hours 25 minutes (including 15 min. intermission)

Theater

American Airlines - 227 W 42nd St

Reviews 

To read reviews of The Road to Mecca on Broadway, click the link below:

Read The Road to Mecca Broadway Reviews!

Buy Tickets

To buy tickets to The Road to Mecca on Broadway click the link below:

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For other Broadway show tickets and Off Broadway show tickets, click the link below:

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