These folks are so boss.

I want to give a shout out to all of the boss’s I’ve had throughout my life who taught me so much.

From my Boss at Domino’s Pizza in the 80s, to my Boss at Cutco in the 90s (Yep, I sold those suckers), to all my Bosses on Broadway when I was Company Managing and General Managing from Nina Lannan to Hal Luftig and so many more.

Here are three great pieces of advice I got from my Boss’s.

1. “People invest in people, not in projects.”

2️. “Take care of the people who work for you. And they will take care of you.”

3️. “Life is NOT work. So make sure you have a life.”

Oh, and one more . . .

And from my greatest Boss, my wife, this one . . .

4. “Just do what I say. You know I’m right.”

So shout out the great bosses in your life by sharing this post with them and saying “thanks!”. And if you are a great boss, keep up the good work!

“Places, Please.”

At the TheaterMakersSummit last year, with over 1,000 people present, we made a prediction.

We made a prediction by choosing the theme of THIS YEAR’s summit a year in advance.

With no vaccines available then, we still believed that the theater would be back this fall.  

So we chose, as our theme . . . “Places, please!”

Fun, right?

And we were wrong. 

Because as of RIGHT NOW, there have already been FOUR Broadway shows running, many National Tours and International Productions, and countless regional and community theater productions.

We may not be back at 100%, but the theater is back.

We’re not going to change our theme.  Because we still believe there is a lot to do to prepare for the return of the theater on Broadway and all over the world.  And a lot to do to make sure that our return produces more theater and better theater . . . for all our audiences and our TheaterMakers as well.

And this year’s Summit looks to be our biggest and best yet.  It should be . . . after all it’s our 5-Year Anniversary!

We’ve got a ton of terrific speakers lined up already including:

  • Douglas Lyons
  • Andrew Lippa
  • Steve H. Broadnax III
  • Brian Moreland
  • Alie B. Gorrie
  • Jacob Stuckelman
  • Sammi Cannold
  • David Korins
  • Georgia Stitt
  • Rashad V. Chambers
  • JJ Maley
  • Dori Berinstein
  • Pun Bandhu
  • Cody Renard Richard
  • Sierra Boggess
  • Dede Ayite
  • Tom Kirdahy
  • Ron Simons

And BY REQUEST panels with

  • Broadway’s Lead Producers
  • Playwrights who are writing for television and other mediums
  • the next generation of Broadway Producers
  • 4 niches that have found their audiences
  • “How It Got To Broadway” case studies
  • Broadway Investors

Oh, and get this new feature we just added . . . “A PITCHING BOOTH!”  Yep, based on the ol’ carney concept of a “Kissing Booth”, we’re giving you a chance for you to line up and quickly pitch your show (or your resume) to Producers, Agents, Investors and more.  Hopefully, you’ll get some love in return. 

(And plan on some IN-PERSON mixers too.)

The Summit is on November 6th and 7th, with a bonus day on the 8th complete with sessions and intensives for those looking for an extra dose of inspiration and education. You can get your ticket now here.  And make sure you do before October 1, because the prices go up the closer we get to the date.

The Summit is my favorite event of the year.  I love theater people . . . and besides an opening night, there is just no other opportunity to get so many people who love the theater and love making theater in one place.

I hope you join us.
To see the full list of speakers, click here.

Podcast Episode #244: What TheaterMakers Can Learn From Simone Biles

ESTIMATED LISTENING TIME OF THIS EPISODE:  7 Minutes

LISTEN WHEREVER YOU LISTEN TO PODCASTS:

ABOUT THIS EPISODE:

If you’ve been following The Olympics this year, or if you’re on the internet, you probably heard Simone Biles withdrew from an individual all-around gymnastics competition at the Tokyo Olympics in an effort to focus on her mental health and well-being, a decision which came one day after she removed herself from the team final.

Tune into my personal reaction of this news and then how I believe we can apply this lesson to all of our lives as we look to reopen the live theater industry.

AFTER YOU LISTEN:

  • FOLLOW The Producer’s Perspective on Apple Podcast (it’s FREE!)
  • REVIEW the Podcast on Apple Podcast (it’s the biggest compliment you can give)
  • SHARE this episode with your friends!
  • JOIN the TheaterMakers Facebook Group

 

My mission is to get more people talking about the theater.  The more people talking about it, the more people who want to make it, perform it, support it, etc.  And that’s how theater not only survives, but thrives.

The biggest compliment you can give me is by sharing this podcast.

I thank you and the theater thanks you!

If you’re raising money for theater, read this . . .

TheaterMakers around the world have had a LOT to worry about over the last 18 months.

And when one worry passed, another one popped up. Am I right? 

(You don’t have to answer that. Because I know I’m right . . . because I’m making theater right along with you. And I know how I’ve felt at times through all this!)

I’ve been tracking a lot of these worries and concerns over the pandemic. And one keeps coming up . . . especially now that shows are getting ready to go back to the rehearsal room.

That concern?

It’s everyone’s favorite thing to do. You know, the reason why people got into the theater. To raise money.  😉

Because this keeps coming up in anxious emails and mentions in my Facebook group, I want to do something to help. If I can.  

I’m digging into some research right now. And asking my Broadway peers what they are experiencing with their investors. (And of course, I’m raising money for my shows as well).

And I’ll have a report for you in a few weeks right here on this blog. (From what I’ve found out so far, it’s going to be pretty fascinating – with some surprises).

But since I’m asking a lot of people, I thought I’d also ask you . . . you who are raising money or thinking about raising money, for your show or for other people’s shows.

Is raising money in a post-covid theater world something you’re concerned about?  

If you’ve got any concerns, questions, etc, click here. I’ve got a 10-second, one-question survey that will help me with my research.

Thanks for your participation, and your passion for doing what you do!
Click here to take the survey about raising money for the theater in 2021. And beyond.

Your last chance to do this, TheaterMakers.

At the beginning of the pandemic, I called everyone I knew for advice. I’m talking big time theater people, as well as big time business people.

“What should I do?”

I got amazing advice. And it reminded me how important it was to ask for advice from others who are at places in their lives where you want to be. (And not just from a business “producer’s perspective” . . . but from a family perspective, a health perspective, a spiritual perspective, and more.)

One of the best pieces of advice I got was . . . “Ken, the people and companies who are going to come out of this ahead are the ones who are going to make use of this time.”

“But how,” I wondered. “Give me something practical I can do while I can’t do theater? I need a to-do list!”

“First, realize you’re not the only one whose business is shut down,” she said.

“Right,” I thought.

“Second, now is a great time for businesses to look at the plumbing of their business.”

I must have looked as confused as my 3-year-old when I asked her if she wanted to watch golf instead of Frozen.

“I don’t have plumb -,” I started to say.

“I’m not talking about literal plumbing. I’m talking about the stuff that makes your business operate. Open up the walls. Clean out the metaphorical closets. Fix the things that you never have a chance to fix when you are working as fast as I know everyone in the theater works when you’re blasting towards an opening night.”

So that’s what we did. A few examples of how we looked at our “plumbing” over the last 15 months?

Redesigned my company and this blog site from top to bottom. (They re-launch in September – watch for the announcement)

Established “flexible hours” and “flexible vacation” work schedule for all my employees.

Took over the bookkeeping of my office myself to understand how we could make it more efficient. (Cutting costs was pretty important through the last year.)

Had the entire office take unconscious bias training. 

Established partnerships with charity.

Established a new plan for social media.

Read at least 30 books on business and wellness.

Hired a business coach to help us figure out how to work on the plumbing of my business.

Closed three businesses that were taking up my time and not aligned with my goals.

And more.

I don’t tell you all this to say . . . “Look what we did.”

I tell you all these to give you ideas on what you can do . . . before the theater roars back at breakneck speed.

Because this pandemic is ending. And it will end. Despite this annoying last ditch attempt by the Delta variant. And despite the annoying individuals who are promoting anti-vaccination misinformation.  

Already there is a frantic pace amongst the Broadway TheaterMakers I talk to daily.

So if you want to look at the plumbing of your business . . . and you should . . . time is running out. 

Oh, and if you’re a one-person band, artrepreneur, TheaterMaker . . . and don’t think you’re a business . . . the first thing you should do . . . is realize you are one.  🙂

Opening up the walls and addressing what keeps you running isn’t the fun part of what we do.  There is no standing ovation for a clean Quickbooks account.  

But it’s one of the many things that will make the next year your best yet.

– – – – –

If you need some referrals for “plumbers” or people who can take your theatermaking business to the next level, from websites, to logo designers to bookkeepers, email me. We love connecting theatermakers with people who can help them clean up and step up their game.

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