Are you a TheaterMaker with a Side Hustle? Let us help your hustle.

Since the Theater biz is so up and down, most TheaterMakers do something on the side to make some bucks.

Some sell real estate. Some coach budding performers. Some make websites. And so on.

Nowadays, since the Theater biz is so down and DOWN, those side hustles, day jobs, survival gigs are more important than ever. Especially since the $600 supplement got lost somewhere in Washington, DC. (As I wrote about here, we could be facing an artistic-exodus if TheaterMakers can’t pay their bills.)

Since Congress hasn’t come up with a way to stimulate the TheaterMaker economy, we’re forced with only one solution.

That solution is always the best one, however.

We’re going to have to solve this ourselves.

How?

We hire each other.

See, while my business has taken a big ol’ hit (like everyone else in the theater space), we still have little jobs we need done here and there. And we’ve made a commitment to hire out-of-work TheaterMakers to do them.

But more importantly, I also know a lot of other people who hire people. And I thought I could tell them all about you.

But I need to know more about you TheaterMakers with side hustles.

So if you’re a web designer, Photoshop expert, real estate broker, tarot card reader, Etsy store seller or whatever, let me know. We may hire you ourselves, but we’ll definitely recommend you to others

And if any of you are looking to hire folks, let me know, as I’m going to have quite the list.

And hiring a TheaterMaker is one of the best ways to support the arts . . . because your money goes straight to the artist.

And it may help them continue to do what they love to do . . . entertain you.

If you want some more business for whatever your side hustle is, click here.

 

(KNOW A THEATERMAKER WITH A SIDE HUSTLE?  FORWARD THIS TO THEM SO WE CAN SEND THEM CLIENTS!  Or share on your social: wp.me/pbmGzd-gmh)

[REMINDER] 10 Days until Apps Due for the Dr. Kenny Encouragement Fund Scholarships

Yesterday, I wrote a post to the recently graduated seniors who are jumping into the deep end of the biz right now (with less water in the pool).

Today’s post is a quick reminder to the future TheaterMakers who are still in school . . . as well as those TheaterMakers who need assistance to keep creating.

A month ago I announced two scholarships in honor of my Dad called The Dr. Kenny Encouragement Fund, and the deadline for applications is due in 10 days . . . on July 31st!

For more info and to apply, click here.

My dad looks forward to encouraging you to keep creating.

And please share if you know a student that could use some help with their tuition.

 

[Announcement] The Dr. Kenny Encouragement Fund Scholarship For TheaterMakers

My message to the 2020 Graduated Seniors getting into the Theater.

You had one dream.
 
You wanted to be in a show. Or direct a show. Or write a show.
 
What did you get instead?
 
A @#$% show.
 
I can’t even imagine what it must be like to be you right now. Look, we’ve all got our own drama to deal with because of the pandemic, but it pains me to think of how it’s affecting you.
 
Because I remember how excited I was to get to it. To audition. To do readings. To drink black coffee at the Westway diner until 3 AM spitballing new show ideas with friends.
 
And now, I have a feeling that the optimism you should have right now . . . the optimism you had in February when you were counting down the days until you were a Pro . . . has faded.
 
I get it. I do.
 
I’m sure you still get yourself pumped up about a Zoom reading, or a self-tape, or a theater that’s opening in Germany. But then, a quick check of CNN sends you into a “Will we ever get back to normal?” spiral.
 
Well, I’m here to tell you that . . . no, we will not get back to normal.
 
And that should get you more excited than the idea of winning your first Tony.
 
Why? Why is THIS the most exciting time to be a graduating senior from a college theater program? Or a high school kid going into a college theater program? Or any kind of TheaterMaker at any age looking to make a career in the theater?
 
The theater is one of the oldest art forms on the planet. It’s filled with glorious traditions, techniques . . . and a whole lot of archaic rules.
 
Especially on Broadway.
 
And now . . those rules are being rewritten all over the world.
 
And you’re going to be the generation that gets to rewrite them.
 
I’ve said before that it would take a “dark period” like we had in the 80s to loosen up its artistic and economic restrictions.
 
And, well, we got it. (I never imagined ALL of our theaters would be empty!)
 
So what makes theater theater? Does theater have to happen in a theater? What can we do about the price of tickets? Or the price of putting on a show?
 
These are all questions that you can help answer . . . when any other time the industry would ignore you.
 
But not now.
 
It’s going to be a painful few months. Maybe even more. But hold tight. Stay strong. Because we will return.
 
And get together with friends . . . just not at the Westway diner just yet. Come up with answers to these questions and questions we haven’t even asked yet.
 
Because you are the future of the theater.
 
Do that and the theater will not only return, but it’ll come back stronger than before.
 
– – – – –
If you are a student or know one, we’ve got a scholarship just for you, see here.  If you’re NOT a student, but just a passionate TheaterMaker, we also have one for you too.  

Dreaming About The Future Of Streaming (thanks to Hamilton).

Oh, if all of my shows could be like Hamilton.

Sure, sure, I’d like the Pulitzer and the Tonys and the billion bucks.

But what I’m talking about now is the giant treasure they had tucked in a vault . . . that they pulled out in the midst of this pandemic.

Yep, I’m talking about the movie they released on Disney+ last week that increased downloads of the D+ app by 74%!

And what I’m dreaming about and proposing for Broadway’s future is that every single play and musical on Broadway films performances of their original cast in the week after opening (just like we record a cast album at about the same time).

And we tuck that sucker away in a vault.

Sounds easy, and I bet you’re nodding your head right now in agreement.

But it’s not that easy.

It’s expensive.

See, Hamilton could afford it. Not only did they have cash to burn, but they also knew there would be a market for their product in the future. (Little did they know what role the movie would play in keeping their brand and Broadway’s brand alive.)

Most plays and musicals do NOT have cash to burn when they open. In fact, most new shows are losing money when they open and therefore can’t afford to invest in a risky insurance policy like spending millions on a shoot.

Never mind that the shoot would have had to be planned months before. (We could try to build this cost into the capitalization, but that might increase the budget by 10-20%, and it’s not like raising previous budgets were a piece of cake.)

So what to do?

In order to capture all of the new shows for posterity and for future revenue opportunities for everyone, including the actors, musicians, and stagehands, we must lower the costs of the capture themselves.

I mean, I’m kicking myself for not having ALL of my shows in a vault right now. I could roll them out and everyone involved would get a check.

But it was too pricey to record Spring Awakening, Once on This Island, Gettin’ the Band Back Together, etc. (And I know that for a fact because I budgeted them all.)

We must reinvent this model in how the labor is paid for video capture (especially since a capture doesn’t require any additional work on behalf of the labor) and then give the labor MORE if/when the capture is distributed.

Think about it this way . . .

It costs a few hundred thousand dollars to record a cast album. And the cast/musicians have to spend a day in a studio, on their day off, recording it. It’s a lot of work. (And most cast albums aren’t making any money, btw).

It can cost 10x as much to capture a show on video. And the labor is paid more than they get for a cast album. . . even though no additional work is required.  For video shoots, the show could be recorded during a regularly scheduled performance (or several).  (If any additional work was required for the shoot – additional rehearsals, etc, then the labor should be paid).

If we lower the cost of capture (please note that I’m saying lower, not eliminate), then every show could put their product in a vault. And then, if the show is a hit and Disney+ or Netflix comes around, then EVERYONE gets paid.

Or give the Producer the option . . . pay the Hamilton model, or pay the bonus-back-end model.

We’re going to need a lot of new models post-pandemic. This is one that could provide an all-important revenue stream for everyone in the future.

Call it COVID-insurance.

And I just kicked myself again for not having it.

– – – –

Want to hear more about streaming from people who know more about it than me?  Sign up now for our 3 part video series about the 3 subjects most on your mind, including streaming . . . featuring the heads of BroadwayWorld and BroadayOnDemand.  See here.

[Announcement] The Dr. Kenny Encouragement Fund Scholarship For TheaterMakers

On March 22nd of this year, just a few months after moving into the city to be closer to me and his granddaughter, my Dad, Dr. Kenny Hasija, had a stroke. And as the sun was coming up on Easter morning, he passed.

It has been an interesting time to deal with this loss to say the least, because my Dad was my coach, my cheerleader, my chief strategist, and my friend. Because boy oh boy, could I have used his caring counsel over the past few months.

And as the corona-crisis continues, I am going to miss having him around over the next several months to do what he did so well, and encourage me to keep on keepin’ on.

My dad has been encouraging me since my earliest memory of him. He urged me to learn more, to try more, to speak up more, to fail more, to fight more, to love more . . . and he sacrificed more than he ever let on to make sure I could take every opportunity I had.

Put it this way . . . how many immigrant Indian Doctors do you know who would say, “Go for it,” when their son said he wanted to give up on law school and pursue a life in the theater???

(He didn’t even blink, by the way.)

His encouragement kept me going then . . . and as I vowed to him in his final few days, I will always keep going.

I also vowed to do everything I could to pass on that spirit of encouragement to my daughter, and to anyone else I met who had a passion for the theater.

So, I started a simple scholarship in his name . . . called The “Dr. Kenny” (as he liked to be called) Encouragement Fund.

I was planning on issuing just one $1,000 gift to someone attending school in the fall and pursuing a career in the theater industry. But after I wrote my blog on Wednesday about the number of artists who may already be out of school but struggling to stay in the city to pursue their dreams, I decided to offer two:

  1.  $1,000 to someone enrolled in or going to post-secondary school.
  2.  $1,000 to any TheaterMaker out there pursuing a career in the business.

If you would like to apply for these scholarships or know someone who would, please click here or share this blog.

Because as I’ve learned from being on the juries for other scholarships, it’s actually hard to get the word out to the folks who could use these funds the most. So please, share this sucker around so we can help encourage folks to keep making theater.

Because we’re going to need TheaterMakers more than ever when this is all over.

I’m hoping to continue this scholarship every year, and I’m hoping that it grows, and that my father’s encouragement to me from above can help me add some zeroes to these amounts.  (If you want to help and join some of my family and my father’s friends who are committed to encouraging others, and learn a bit more about my dad, click here.)

To be honest, I even thought about waiting to start this scholarship until I got that big fat hit I will have someday and I could give more.

But then, on Father’s Day this year, I remembered some of the encouraging advice that my Dad gave me years ago.

“Just start, Kenneth. Begin. A seed can’t grow until it is planted.”

I hope that my Dad’s advice and this gift can help encourage some of you.

To apply, click here.

 

Ken Davenport
Ken Davenport

Tony Award-Winning Broadway Producer

I'm on a mission to help 5000 shows get produced by 2025.

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