I Discovered The Secret of Happiness. It’s a Virtual Reunion of Daddy Long Legs!

In 2015, we streamed Daddy Long Legs LIVE to the world, and it became the very first Broadway or Off-Broadway show to take our performance virtual.

We were seen by over 150k people in 135 countries around the world.  And when all the press articles started appearing on our efforts, and when our box office went up, and when our two stars started getting recognized on the street, we knew we were on to something with this streaming thing.

And now, 5 years later, streamin’ is the only thing we have.

Since my out-of-the-box-thinking and super courageous artists on Daddy Long Legs were so instrumental in ushering in the idea of theater-to-stream, I couldn’t think of a better group to reunite online during these cray-cray times.

So, on Thursday, May 21st, I’m hosting a Daddy Long Legs Reunion on my daily livestream series, The Producer’s Perspective LIVE!, to raise money and awareness for The Actors Fund.

And look who’s gonna be there!

Megan McGinnis (Jerusha Abbott), Adam Halpin (Jervis Pendleton), John Caird (Book & Director), Paul Gordon (Music & Lyrics), and Michael Jackowitz (Producer).

Tune in to my Facebook page on Thursday, May 21st at 8pm EDT / 7pm CDT / 6pm MDT / 5pm PDT.

And if you’re like me and are now feeling super nostalgic for Daddy Long Legs, or you haven’t seen it yet (gasp), you can see it FREE on BroadwayHD. They’re running a free trial to all of you who want to see in before the reunion.  (My advice . . . watch it RIGHT before!)  Daddy has become one of the most popular titles on BroadwayHD, and when you watch it, you’ll see why.

To replay Daddy Long Legs: click here and use this code: DLLBHD

To listen to the tear-jerkin’ recording, click here to get it on Spotify, here on Amazon, or here on Apple Music.

I look forward to seeing you on the livestream on May 21st at 8pm EDT!

 

 

P.S. Don’t have Facebook? No problem. We’re also streaming to Broadway Podcast Network’s Youtube Channel.

P.P.S. Tune in tonight at 8pm EDT. I’ll be sitting down with Ashley Park to talk about Mean Girls, KPOP, Sunday In The Park…, Thoroughly Modern Millie, and more! Join the conversation here.

Tonight on the Livestream: Tony Nominee Ashley Park

Big thanks to Julie Halston for cracking all of us last night on the show!

If you didn’t catch it, click here – not only will she have one LOLing, but she also dropped some pretty big news, including that she’s in discussion to play Joan Rivers!

Check her replay and all the replays of our 41 (!) episodes here!

And tonight, we’re joined by Tony nominee and not-so Mean Girl, Ashley Park (Mean Girls, Grand Horizons, Sunday In The Park With George, KPOP).

What is Ashley up to these days? How is she keeping positive during this time, especially when her Encores’ production of Thoroughly Modern Millie was canceled.  Tune at 8pm EDT tonight to find out! (Click here to get an e-reminder!).

To see the full line-up of guests for the next few weeks visit www.theproducersperspective.com/LIVE.

———–

(Oh, by the way – a lot of you have asked about our platform since so many of you are looking to stream your own shows, readings, etc.  We love StreamYard, the platform we’ve been using.  Click here to check them out.)

Broadway’s return isn’t about marketing. It’s about habit-ing.

While we don’t exactly know when we’ll be able to ‘light the lights’ on Broadway just yet . . . there’s already been a lot of discussion about how to get our audiences’ butts back in our non-socially-distanced seats.

“What do we say to our audiences?”  “When and where do we say it?”  “What incentive or offer do we need to provide?”

These are all classic marketing questions whenever you bring a product to market . . . but no one on Broadway could ever have imagined we’d have to ask them to figure out how we bring our product back to market.

All of these questions need answers, and I have it on very good authority (cuz I’ve seen the plans myself) that some of the brightest advertising and marketing minds on Broadway EVER are working on this challenge just as hard as the scientists all over the world are working on a vaccine.

And they’re going to crack it.  And I’m sure we’ll see a fantastic return to Broadway campaign . . . as soon as we know when Broadway is going to return.

That said, to return to the record breakin’ levels Broadway was pre-Covid, and to grow beyond them, we’re going to be required to be more than marketers . . . we’re going to need to be habit-makers.

Stick with me here . . .

If you’ve ever tried to make a change in your life . . . exercise more, eat healthily, stop smoking, etc., then you know, that kind of change is haaaaard.

That’s because what you’re doing is trying to create a brand new habit in your life.

And that’s like trying to turn the Titanic.

You’re set in your ways.  You are “at rest.”  And just like Newton taught us, “an object at rest tends to stay at rest.”

Of course, it’s not impossible.  You can get to the gym, change your diet, drop your golf handicap, whatever you want . . . it just takes a lot of effort . . . and time.

How much time?

Well, there are all sorts of theories on how long it takes to create a habit. Some say 21 days.  Some say 30 days.  Some say months . . .

One of the best books I’ve read that had a huge habit-making impact on my personal and professional life is Atomic Habits by James Clear.  In it, James suggests it takes about two months to create an automatic habit (like getting up early, writing every day, etc.).

And here’s the problem that is related to theatergoing . . . the moment you skip a workout, binge on some Oreos instead of almonds, etc., the harder it is to get back on track.  Especially if that habit is expensive and time-consuming.  You’ve probably experienced this yourself, right?

Now, what does this have to do with the price of a Broadway ticket in a pandemic?

For the core Broadway theatergoer . . . going to Broadway is a habit.   Some have a once once a month habit.   Others 4x a year.  But however often they go . . . it’s a habit.

And that habit was just broken.  Big time.

To put it in terms we can all understand . . . We’re not just skipping going to the gym.  The gym was shut down entirely.

Pretty easy to just sit on your couch and not sweat, am I right?

And, when this sort of thing happens, it’s not only that old habits are broken.  It’s that new ones are created.  And those new habits are usually whatever is readily available and easy (enter the couch and the Oreos).  And right now, that might be, oh, I don’t know, Netflix, Disney+, Amazon Prime . . . YouTube!  (Don’t get me started on why theater and Broadway isn’t more available on streaming platforms . . . actually DO get me started! I’ll just save it for a blog next week.)

If all this wasn’t enough, the longer that time goes by before we try to restore a broken habit, the harder it is to get it back again.

An object at rest tends to stay at rest.

So, to sum up . . .

For the average theatergoer, the habit of going to the theater is broken.  And new habits are taking its place.  And these new habits grow stronger every day, as the old habit of going to the theater grow weaker.

We’re not the only industry that this is happening to, of course.  People are creating new habits of cooking, and breaking habits of going out (this survey says half of the people who are cooking more will continue that habit.)  People can’t go to the gym, so they’re exercising at home, or not.

And these new habits will affect the rebound of the restaurant industry and the gym.

In any business, making your product a habit with the most amount of people possible is what makes your product a smash hit.  Checking your Facebook page, your morning Starbucks, Googling something every time you need an answer . . . habits are why these companies are billion-dollar empires.

Our job now is not just to market Broadway, but we must come up with ways to restore the theatergoing habit to the people who have lost it.

How do we do it?  Good question.

Good news/bad news?  We probably have a bit of time to figure it out.

So tell me, how would you put the habit of going to the theater back into the lifestyle of our audience?

Throw some ideas in the comments below and I’ll do a follow-up blog with some ideas in the next few weeks.

(Oh, and I meant it about that streaming blog . . . expect a rant coming soon to this space.)

 

———————–
P.S. Join me and my guest tonight as we go LIVE on my Facebook page. I’m thrilled to be sitting down with Julie Halston (Tootsie, On The Town, Hairspray) at 8pm EDT here.

 

Tonight on the Livestream: Queen of Comedy, Julie Halston

I had a blast chatting with Rob McClure last night! Despite Broadway shutting down just days into previews for Mrs. Doubtfire, Rob is looking ahead and making the most of this time . . . he’s writing, he’s creating Conductor Cam videos (watch ’em here), he’s watching his daughter grow up!

To catch the replay and find out what role he wishes to play in 25 years, click here.

And we get to keep laughing with tonight’s guest, Julie Halston (Tootsie, On The Town, Gypsy, Hairspray) How is Julie keeping herself busy these days? Tune at 8pm EDT tonight to find out! (Click here to get an e-reminder!).

To see the full line-up of guests for the next few weeks visit www.theproducersperspective.com/LIVE.

———–

(Oh, by the way – a lot of you have asked about our platform since so many of you are looking to stream your own shows, readings, etc.  We love StreamYard, the platform we’ve been using.  Click here to check them out.)

Cuomo had a big marketing problem. Guess who he asked for help?

The Governor of NY wants his citizens to wear masks.

And he ran out of ways to get people to do it.

That, my friends, is a marketing problem.  He’s trying to sell something.  And not enough people are buying.

So, he hired a big fancy ad agency to come up with a TV ad to get people to wear masks, right?

Wrong!

He didn’t hire anybody.  Instead, to solve one of the most important marketing dilemmas of all time, he asked his daughter for help.

And she came up with the idea for a “Make Your Own Mask Commercial” contest.

Here’s how it works:

You make a video telling NYers why they should wear a mask.   You upload it to a website.  They pick five finalists.  NYers vote for their favorites.  The top vote-getter has their video turned into a PSA commercial that runs on the air.  (And probably launches the career of a filmmaker.)

(You can learn more about the contest, including how to submit, here.)

Amazing, right?  Sounds like our Social Distancing Festival.

What I love about this idea is that it didn’t come from the Communications Director for the State of NY.  No.  When faced with a crisis, on pandemic proportions or even if you’re just producing a play, you don’t just ask the experts . . . you ask everyone!

The best ideas win, and just like in this case, the winners often come from the “audience” themselves, not just from people paid to think like an audience.

 

Oh, and also . . . please wear a mask.

And then submit a video about it!

 

Ken Davenport
Ken Davenport

Tony Award-Winning Broadway Producer

I'm on a mission to help 5000 shows get produced by 2025.

Featured Program
The TheaterMakers Studio
Featured Product
Be A Broadway Star
Featured Book
Broadway Investing 101
All Upcoming Events

may, 2020

No Events

Featured Webinar
Path to Production Webinar
Advertisement
X