[SURVEY RESULTS] Will Broadway need an Investor Stimulus Package?

The focus of everyone in the theater industry over the past few weeks has been on two questions:

  • When will Broadway come back?
  • And when Broadway comes back . . . will our audience come back with it?

These are vital questions, of course . . . but there is another super important query that hasn’t been discussed yet.

  • Will the Broadway Investor come back?

Broadway is a collection of small businesses.  And except for a few movie studios and the non-profits, all of the shows are funded by individual investors.  It’s because of said Broadway Investors’ passion and appetite for the arts (despite the enormous risk) that everyone who works in the theater has a job.  Period.  From Producers to Performers to Writers to Ushers to Ad Agencies to Reporters.  Everyone’s salary is paid by the Broadway Investor.

So, if those Investors don’t come back . . . well, I think you get the point.

Will they or won’t they?  And since almost every person on the planet has less money now than they did three months ago, will our investors have enough capital to risk?  Will Producers be able to raise enough to fund a $15mm, $20mm, or $30mm production???  Would the money for groundbreaking productions like Hadestown, Dear Evan Hansen, or even Hamilton been raised in a post-pandemic world?

And if the box office for Broadway goes down (which it’s going to), then the risk of investing in Broadway goes up.  So if our industry has suddenly become higher risk, and our investors have less money than they did, what do we need to do to make sure they continue to invest?

These were the types of questions that I’ve been asking myself as I have been trying to sleep at night.  They are the same questions that have turned my hair a wee bit grayer (as you can see poking out from underneath my hat on my livestream.)

Which brings me to this blog.  See, whenever I have anxiety-inducing questions that I don’t have the answers to, I just ask the people who do have the answers.

In this case, that means asking actual Broadway Investors.

So that’s what I did.

I sent out a short survey to actual, real-life, Broadway Investors . . . both my own, as well as people who I know have invested in Broadway shows, but have not invested with me.  I also enlisted the help of some of my peers who sent out the survey to their investor list.

And while I’ve surveyed Broadway Investors before, I was unsure of the response rate we’d get.  I mean, let’s face it, there are more important things for a lot of folks to think about right now than investing in Broadway.

Shows you what I know, because we had a tremendous response . . . double my usual survey response rate . . . which yielded a sample size of several hundred Broadway Investors.  (The high participation rate also shows you how passionate Broadway Investors are about Broadway.)

Ready for the results?  Here they are:

 

RESULTS OF THE BROADWAY INVESTOR POST COVID-19 PANDEMIC SURVEY

First, we started with some demographic info to get a sense of who the Broadway Investor is, where they are, etc.

1. What is your age?

18-24…0.00%

25-34…5.29%

35-44…13.22%

45-54…16.74%

55-64…33.48%

65+…31.28%

2. What state do you reside in?  (Only reporting the top states)

New York…48.20%

California…14.41%

Florida…5.41%

Massachusetts…3.60%

New Jersey…3.60%

Connecticut…3.15%

Texas…3.15%

Illinois…1.80%

District of Columbia (DC), Maryland, Ohio, Pennsylvania, & Virginia….1.35%

This info is fascinating by itself as it gives you a glimpse of where our money comes from.  Obviously, how these specific states bounce back from Coronavirus will affect the individual investors’ propensity to invest.  So get to it, California!

(And by the way – you can see that the Broadway Investors’ whereabouts coincide with the whereabouts of the Broadway ticket buyer – proving what we all know but sometimes forget – the Broadway Investor IS the Broadway theatergoer.)

Ok, back to the survey.  Now that we determined who we were talking to, we got into their investor history . . .

3. How many shows have you previously invested in?

0…0.44%

1…12.83%

2-5…33.19%

6-10…23.89%

11+…29.65%

4. On average, how much do you invest in each Broadway show?

$10,000-$25,000…40.53%

$25,000-$50,000…33.04%

$50,000-$100,000…12.33%

$100,000-$250,000…7.93%

$250,000-$500,000…4.85%

$500,000+…4.85%

As you can see, once a Broadway Investor gets the bug, there is a tendency to keep investing.  Over half of the respondents invested in more than SIX shows . . . so far!  But, because they like to play the volume game (which also diversifies their investments), an overwhelming majority (almost 75%) keep their investments under $50k.  And in addition to diversifying their Broadway Investment portfolio, they also get to more opening nights.  🙂

Now we started to get to the pandemic-related investing questions in the survey:

5. Before the pandemic, how likely were you to invest in Broadway in the next 12 months?

Definitely…20.18%

Very likely…17.54%

Most likely…31.14%

Not very likely…27.19%

Definitely not…3.95%

6. Now how likely are you to invest in a Broadway show in the next 12 months?

Definitely…2.19%

Very likely…4.39%

Most likely…18.42%

Not very likely…50.00%

Definitely not…25.00%

Ok, here is when you start to see the effects of the pandemic on an individual’s willingness to invest in the short term.  A startling 20% were DEFINITELY going to invest in a show in the next year, and now that has decreased to just over 2%.  Yikes.  And the DEFINITELY NOTS are the reverse ratio, with now 25% saying there is nothing that can be done to get them to invest in the next 12 months.

And 75% of those polled are in the “not very likely” or “definitely not” categories compared to 31% before the pandemic.

Not so good.  But are you surprised?  Everything people like to do, whether that’s investing or eating out, will be done with much less regularity in the post-covid world.

More questions . . .

7. If you were to invest in a Broadway show in the next 12 months, how much would you invest?

Same as my average…38.53%

More than my average…0.92%

Less than my average…26.61%

Depends on the production…33.94%

8. Before the pandemic, what types of shows were you investing in?

Plays…42.99%

Musicals…81.31%

Revivals of plays…24.77%

Revivals of musicals…38.79%

Depends on the production…33.18%

9. Post-pandemic, what types of shows will you consider investing in?

Plays…19.23%

Musicals…43.27%

Revivals of plays…12.02%

Revivals of musicals…21.15%

Depends on the production…67.79%

Looking at what they’ll do in the future, I was genuinely surprised to see that the majority would either continue investing their usual amount, or would vary that amount depending on the opportunity.  My takeaway?  Investors are going to be looking for value.

You can get the same takeaway from the types of shows they say they will be interested in investing in post-pandemic.  Many have lost their passion for one category and stated that the type of shows they will invest in will depend on that production itself.  The show with the most value will win.

10. Complete this sentence: After the pandemic, investing in a Broadway show will be…

Riskier…70.62%

Less risky…0.95%

Just as risky as it was before…28.44%

Duh.

Obviously I knew what the answer would be here . . . but I asked it anyway because I was more interested in the percentage of people choosing the “just as risky” option, which, honestly, was higher than I expected.  There are some optimists out there!

And now . . . here comes the literal money shot question of the survey.

11. Which of the following would increase the likelihood that you would invest in a Broadway show in the next 12 months?  (You may check more than one)

A vaccination…69.34%

Less expensive production costs…54.72%

Less expensive weekly operating costs…54.25%

Economic recovery…51.89%

Antibody testing…46.70%

Stars/Celebrities…21.70%

Other…17.92%

Obviously a vaccination is what will get the world spinning again, not just Broadway.

But most likely, the folks reading this blog aren’t going to be able to control when we get a vaccine.  That’s why we need to focus on what we can control.

Which brings us to the 2nd and 3rd most popular answers to this question . . . over antibody testing or even economic recovery . . . decreasing our costs.

And it makes sense.  Because when an industry’s risks go up, the savvy investor (which is what we obviously have here), doesn’t just run for the hills, never to return . . . they say, “Show me you’re doing something to balance this increased risk, and I’ll come back.”

And that, all you Broadway Investors out there, is something we can control.

 

So, overall, what do I think now that I’ve done this survey?

Well, some people might look at all of the above responses to this survey and get depressed.  I didn’t.  In fact, after seeing these numbers, I am JUST starting to sleep at night (the hair isn’t going changing back from grey, however).

What I see in the data above is that the Broadway Investor will return . . . we just need to make it more valuable for them.  They see it as riskier.  We immediately make it less risky by reducing the costs (as they are asking for), and by doing what our job has always been . . . to find them great shows by great writers with great actors that they can’t NOT invest in.

It’s not going to be easy.  It’s going to take all of us working together.  But this is not only what our Employers (aka Broadway Investors) want, but it’s what they need to keep playing our now even higher-risk game.

And if we don’t, well, a whole bunch of us might be looking for new jobs.

– – – – –

Interested in learning more about investing in Broadway shows, including how it works, as well as more strategies to reduce the risk and increase your return?  Click here to get the bestselling and only book on the subject.

 

P.S. Join me and tonight’s guest, Kerry Butler, on The Producer’s Perspective LIVE! tonight on my Facebook page at 8pm EDT.

Why Broadway May Have An Advantage Before It Opens Back Up

At the start of my first of seven (!) Zoom calls today, one of the participants said, “Ok, new Zoom rule – we are not allowed to talk about when Broadway is coming back.”

“Agreed!”

“Yes!”

“Love that!”

We all echoed electronically.

Then we broke that pact about seven seconds later.

We just couldn’t help it!

Since none of us can avoid this “Who shot JR” question I might as well talk about it here too.

Here are the two things that we absolutely know, for a fact, about Broadway’s return.

  1. We don’t know when Broadway is going to come back.
  2. It’s going to be later than everyone wants.

Sorry, but that’s ALL that we know.

So now what do we talk about?!?!?!?

I’ve got an idea . . . how about we talk about that 2nd thing . . . and how being later gives Broadway an advantage over any other gatherings out there.  And how that advantage could mean our audiences come back quicker than elsewhere.

See, here’s the thing . . .

Broadway is not going to lead the comeback of theater.

Hard to imagine, but Broadway is not going to be first.

We’re the epicenter, for goodness sake.  And our theaters are smaller.  And the lines for the bathrooms.  Scheez.

We shouldn’t come back first.

And, as we know, states are already starting to loosen their stay-at-home restrictions.  And, provided they go well (everything crossed!), after bowling alleys and hair salons will come churches and restaurants . . . and eventually, theaters.

That’s right, the theater will come back in the United States via community theaters, regional theaters, touring productions . . . before Broadway.

In fact, right now, theater IS back in other places around the world.  (Seoul, Korea has a production of Phantom performing now, as well as others!)

The upside to being last?

We get to see how everyone else does it before we even try.

Broadway will get to learn from all these theatrical test cases before we let one patron enter our blessed buildings.  We get to watch what other markets do and find out works, what doesn’t . . . and what we need to do better.

We’ll have tons of data on how to do it the right way.  AND, here’s the double-bonus . . . if the theaters open around our country and around the world and there is no increase in infection rate?  Well, they’ll be that much more comfortable coming to see a show in the theater capital of the world.  They’ll have dipped their toe into the gathering-market.

So, while it usually isn’t good for any business to be last-to-market, in this case, it may be a blessing.

 

Because of this, I’d have Broadway minds and Regional Theater minds working together.  Our success is their success and vice-versa.

(Action Item:  If you’re a theater owner, operator, or just plan TheaterMaker – reach out to a peer in another state, or even someone who might in “ordinary times” be considered a competitor and work together.  Never before has the theater world been so connected.  And it’s that connection that will get us through this.)


P.S. Tonight on the livestream, I’m joined by Tony-nominated Director Michael Arden and Actor Andy Mientus! Tune in at 8pm EDT to find out what they’ve been up to recently . . . click here to set your reminder!

 

[Your Input Needed] What Can We Do To Make Our Theatergoers More “Comfortable” Post COVID?

I need your help.

Scratch that.

Broadway . . . nope.  Scratch that too.

The theater needs your help.

The good news is that our city, state, and federal officials are turning their attention towards how we open up our country again.  While our eyes must continue to be on the ball of stopping the spread of this piece of @#$% virus, it looks like we’ve made enough progress to at least start thinking about how we open up our offices, our restaurants, and yes, our theaters.

(Although, for the record, there are some elected officials out there who seem to think that going bowling is more important than stopping the spread right now – and to the citizens of those states, I say this . . . just because someone says it is ok to do something, doesn’t mean you have to do that thing.  It’s legal to smoke, but that doesn’t mean anyone should do it.  Same thing here, folks – except this @#$% of a @#$%ing virus could kill you a lot faster than smoking.  Sorry to be so direct – but, well, there ain’t no time for niceties.)

The theaters will probably be the last to get the go-ahead from the Doctors and other folks whose opinions are not politically motivated that it’s ok to proceed with our plays and musicals . . . which is where you come in.

The world has shifted.  We’ve lost months.  And millions of dollars.  Thousands of jobs.

And we could lose hundreds of thousands of theatergoers.

To put it in marketing-speak . . . there is more friction now than ever before preventing the casual theatergoer from buying a ticket.

They’re scared.

Our job as theatrical Harold Hills (salesmen and saleswomen) is to simply REDUCE THAT FRICTION to not just telling them they are safe, but making them so.

While the theatergoer might be concerned with the cost of a ticket, I’d postulate that they are going to be more concerned with whether or not they can get sick as a result of buying that ticket . . . even when the doctors say it’s ok to gather.

So . . . what can we as theater producers, artistic directors, venue operators, etc. do to make our theatergoers more comfortable with not just buying a ticket, but actually going to the theater.

I’ve got some ideas.  And I’m going to list them below.  But this blog is not meant to be a “10 Things I’d Do To . . . ” entry.  Because we’re in unchartered territory here, to say the least.  And what do I know?

This blog is meant to be a giant whiteboard where you can scribble down your ideas.

That’s right . . .

I want YOU to give me YOUR IDEAS on how to make our audiences feel more comfortable when they come back to the theater.

Fill up the comments with suggestions, thoughts brainstorms, ideas, etc.  And there is no idea too big, too “crazy” or too challenging.  Just put it up.  Don’t even think about it too much.  Pretend that this is a sprint.  You have 30 seconds to come up with as many ideas as possible!  Go!

Let’s get 100 or more so we have more of a chance of finding the silver marketing bullet that helps keeps our customers safe when they come back to us.  And I promise to sift through them and pass them on to our industry leaders.

Because who better than to tell us what we need to do next, than you, people who actually buy tickets.

Ok, I’m going to kick this off with 10 free-associated ideas in no particular order . . . put 30 seconds on the clock . . . and here I GO!

HOW TO MAKE THEATERGOERS MORE COMFORTABLE WITH THEATERGOING POST COVID

  1. Signage in all bathrooms reminding not just employees to wash their hands but reminding EVERYONE to wash their hands.
  2. A pre-show email that offers free-exchanges for anyone not feeling feel, with a reminder of symptoms to look out for and a recommendation they take their own temperature before they leave the house on the day of the performance . . . even if they have no symptoms.
  3. Show branded masks distributed to theatergoers on the way in (I told you there was no idea too crazy!).
  4. No physical tickets so no ticket pickup – electronic tickets only.
  5. Asking for “Recommended Sanitation Guidelines For Large Venues” from the CDC, adhering to them, and asking for a “Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval” that will show patrons we’re “Following the guidelines prepared by the federal government.”
  6. Opening the theaters earlier.
  7. Temperature checks of patrons at the theater.
  8. Hand sanitizer becomes the new Ricola both backstage and front-of-house.
  9. Merchandise sold outside the theaters or online only (this one was hard for me to type – because it would definitely affect a show’s bottom line).
  10. “At-Risk” social distanced performances . . . taking a cue from the grocery stores, certain shows (Wednesday matinees perhaps?) are designed for at-risk audiences and only 30-50% of the house is sold to allow for social distancing.

How I’d do?  Any have merit?

I’m sure you can do better.  So let’s see ’em.  Great ideas are out there.  The fact is, and we’re going to need them all.

So, ready, set  . . . GO!

(And please share this blog – the more ideas – the better chance the theater has in getting back to where it was the fastest!)

—————
P.S. I’ll be going LIVE tonight on my Facebook page with Tony-nominated Composer Joe Iconis (Be More Chill, Broadway Bounty Hunter). Join us here at 8pm EDT.

 

5 Predictions for the Post Coronavirus World . . . and Broadway.

As a few cities around the world start to see some “leveling” of the curve (if not necessarily flattening) and as NYC approaches its apex, it’s time to start looking ahead.

While we are far from out-of-the viral woods yet (and every single effin’ person out there should be so sheltered-in-place, it should feel like you’re starring in your own one-person show), I’m getting a sense of what our world, and of course, our business, might look like in the months, years, and decades to come.

Here are five predictions for our post-Corona world:

1. We will have a Doctor as President.

We’ve had Lawyers and Generals as Presidents already, so it only makes sense that the next profession that will rise to the Commander in Chief role in the next 4-5 election cycles (20 years or so) will be a physician.  We’ve already had one run recently, and expect more to come.

As Fauci and Birx have proven, physicians can lead with more honesty, transparency, and intelligence than many of our typical politicians.

WHAT THIS MEANS FOR OUR INDUSTRY:  The reason we’ll want a Doc behind that desk is that we’re all going to want to feel safer and more protected by the folks in charge.  The “Presidents” of our industry (Theater Owners, Artistic Directors, Presenting Houses, Producers) will need to take extra steps to let our audiences know that we have THEIR safety at the top-of-our-minds.  Informing audiences of cleaning policies, signage about washing hands, recommendations to NOT come to the theater if you’re ill (dare I say, a more open exchange policy?), will all be key to getting our audience to show up instead of staying home.

2. Cash is no longer king and isn’t even in the court.

About 3 years ago, I stopped exchanging money when I went to a foreign country.  I just used my credit card and my apps.

One year ago, I stopped carrying cash in this country. There’s no question that paying by cash is way on its way out, but this virus will accelerate that phenomenon.  We bought everything we needed during our sequestered time by credit card online, and many of our necessities came with “contactless” delivery.

Oh, and the other reason cash will slowly disappear is because cash is, well, dirty.  After this is over, will you really want to put your hands on something that 1,000 other people have touched?

WHAT THIS MEANS FOR OUR INDUSTRY:  Our consumers are going to want more ways to purchase their tickets via apps and online.  Box office pickups and hard tickets will decrease even more than they already have.  The ticketing companies who take the lead with mobile purchasing will win the day and the service fees that go along with it.

3. I’d “short” commercial real estate.

There’s nothing like mother nature forcing you to do something to prove that you can do it.  And the “something” in this case is work remotely.  The entire world is working from home right now, and a whole bunch of businesses (maybe even mine?) will come out of this saying, “Wait a minute, we just survived on Zoom . . . and I could save how much money if I didn’t have my office?” The Commercial Real Estate market is going to go through a major disruption as a result of Corona.  The upside?  Less commuting, less pollution, and yes, less chance of another virus spreading as fast as this one.

WHAT THIS MEANS FOR OUR INDUSTRY:  We’re not a biz that embraces tech very well, but we took a leap forward these past few weeks.  (Just yesterday I saw some folks figure out how to have a Zoom call who last month were still trying to get their VCRs to stop flashing 12:00 AM!)  While we’ll still be a face-to-face industry (since we require our audiences to be in a room, a lot of our business will still happen in a room), remote working will give those who embrace it an advantage.

4. Like Rock-n-Roll, live streaming is here to stay.

When I livestreamed Daddy Long Legs, I knew it would never replace what we do.  But I also knew it could definitely help market it, and provide other revenue streams for Artists, Producers, Investors, and all sorts of TheaterMakers.When Broadway shut down, I got a least a dozen emails in about an hour with all sorts of livestreamin’ ideas.  Obviously, we executed one of those ideas, and about a hundred other live streamin’ options popped up online right behind it.

And all these incredible initiatives won’t just disappear.  But don’t worry.  It won’t replace the “live” of what we do either.  It will only enhance it.  And this quarantine has given us a very valuable marketing tool that our audience (and our unions) will now truly embrace.

5. Oh, and yes, we are going to come back . . . in a big way.

As usual, some folks have used this crisis to signal the end of theater as we know it.  While I appreciate the “drama” of those statements, those self-proclaimed pundits are just dead wrong.  The theater has been around for thousands of years.  It has survived all sorts of world events, from wars to the invention of the television, and yeah, even epidemics and plagues and more, oh my. We will get through this.  And we will come back, bigger and better than before.  Gathering together for a common purpose . . . to share an experience as a community . . . is a primal human need.  And because we’re going to be so starved for it after our time in this social-distancing-desert we’ve been isolated in, we’re going to want to go to restaurants and bars and you betcha, theaters.  Will it happen overnight?  Probably not.  People have less money right now, and that will affect attendance more than fear of catching the bug.

But just close your eyes for a second and imagine . . . imagine what that first night back in a Broadway theater is going to be like.  Just imagine that ovation when the overture starts or the curtain rises.  Imagine the energy.

It makes me want to buy a ticket right now.  And it’ll make other people want to too.

 

How do you think the world is gonna change?  How do you think the business is going to change?  Let me know in the comments below!

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Are you watching our livestream? Tonight, Director/Actor Lonny Price will be LIVE with me on The Producer’s Perspective LIVE! Tune in. Tonight at 8pm EDT.

You can also go back and watch all 15 other episodes including Jeanine Tesori, Kevin McCollum, Sergio Trujillo, and more!

 

Why Politicians Need A Marketing Lesson To Get People To Stay Inside.

In his daily midday address the other day, the butt-kickin’ Governor of NY, Andrew Cuomo, once again tried to emphasize how important it was that everyone stayed the @#$% inside during this crisis.

“I’ve tried to say this so many different ways,” he said, obviously frustrated that he was still not getting his message through to all the right people.

And he’s not the only one.

“Staying inside saves lives,” all the Politicians and Docs have said over the past few weeks.  “Because sure, sure, 80% of the folks who get it will recover, but you could pass it on to someone that is one of the unlucky folks who don’t.  So stay inside to help others.”

Makes sense.  A very compelling argument, right?

Of course.  But unfortunately, it’s just not enough for a heck of a lot of people.

What all the folks behind those podiums are forgetting is that they are selling something.  It’s just not a product that comes in an Amazon box.  It’s a message.  And that message could be more valuable than Jeff Bezos’s entire net worth.

And to get people to “buy” it, they need to go back to marketing basics.

When designing a marketing campaign of any kind, you must remember The Non-Golden Rule . . . people do things for what’s in it for them.  As ugly as it is to admit . . . self-interest is the public’s primary motivating factor.

Gross but true.

So telling people how staying inside will help other people may not be the most effective way to get these folks to actually do it.

It should be part of the argument, for sure.  But in my opinion, the Politicians and Doctors are missing out on a very important part of the message. . .

And the lead that they’ve buried is this . . . even though 80% of the people who get this thing may not have to go to the hospital, they could be dreadfully and disgustingly ill.

I was reminded of this myself when I read Drew Gasparini’s Instagram Story the other day.  If you don’t know him, Drew is a composer-who-will-be-reckoned-with (he’s the guy behind the upcoming Karate Kid score and he was featured on my Podcast recently as #SongWriterOfTheWeek) who also just battled COVID-19 and is now, thankfully, on the other side.

But before he broke the virus’s back, this is what he went through:

It is not hyperbolic when I say this is easily the sickest I’ve ever felt to the point that my own mind was questioning whether or not I was going to be able to wake up the next day.

There was nothing to prepare me for how god awful it is.  I am on day 10, and I am very very slowly turning the corner but my experience was so bad that I am still very much just a shell of myself.  I have never in my life felt as sick or scared that my body couldn’t handle something in my entire life. Ever. Not even close.

Here’s what my week felt like:

  • Constant fever between 100-103 (treated every 4-6 hours with Tylenol)
  • Chills and aches. Sometimes it got so bad that I would shiver when I left bed to the point that I would fall to my knees and have a hard time getting back up.
  • No taste or smell (this is common with this virus)
  • The fatigue was (still is) so bad I could barely lift my head or open my eyes. The most I traveled was from my bed to the couch and I really weighed out the bathroom trips.
  • Perpetual nausea. It was constant, and painful as I tried to force nutrients into my body…
  • Anytime I did eat it would be immediate (overshare) diarrhea.
  • A cough, that once it started it would become a long coughing fit

– Drew

So tell me, readers.  Even if you knew you’d recover . . . do you want to deal with any of that, never mind all of that?

And I’ve heard even worse from others.  One friend and industry professional I know had to take pain-killers because his body aches were so bad.

Another threw up blood.  Another had blood coming out the other end.

I don’t know about you, but that’s enough to make me stay inside and bodywash with sanitizer.

And that message could affect the behavior of others in the way the politicians, doctors, and everyone wants and needs.

Hearing what the virus has the potential to do to YOU not only gets at the self-interest in all of us, but it also invokes one of the other primary marketing axioms . . . The Pain-Pleasure Principle.

People will always run to pleasure.  And run from pain.

The current marketing of this “stay inside” message hasn’t showcased enough personal pain to get some of the population to trade in the pleasure of going to spring break, gathering at friend’s apartments, etc.

In fact, the “marketing” has done the opposite.  The current message, and I’m quoting a website here, is “Most people infected with the COVID-19 virus will experience mild to moderate respiratory illness and recover without requiring special treatment.”

While that may be true, and while it does prevent panic, from a marketing perspective, it doesn’t help keep people locked down.  If we want people to listen, we need to tell them, “You can get this.  And yes, you’ll most likely recover.  But in the process, it could hurt.  A lot.  So prevent yourself from the chance of (INSERT DISGUSTING SYMPTOMS HERE) and stay inside.  Doing so will keep you feeling great, and could also save the lives of your friends, family and fellow New Yorkers.”

(This theory is the same that was used in those very successful anti-smoking ads that show people speaking with no larynx, etc.)

I’m sure most of the people who read this blog are the part of the population who are staying inside.  But if you know people who aren’t, and you really want to get them to stay inside, use the above message on them, will ya?

And special thanks to Drew for his honesty.

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Last night on our live stream we featured Actor, Producer, Artrepreneuer ALAN CUMMING!  Click here to watch the replay and hear him talk about . . .

  • How he’s utilizing this time of forced isolation to write his next book. . . and bake homemade crackers!
  • His number one tip to negotiating (you may be surprised by his response . . .)
  • What he’s learned from doing his podcast, Homosapiens.

And tonight at 8 PM EDT, we have stage director Leigh Silverman joining us!  Click here to get a reminder to tune in!

Ken Davenport
Ken Davenport

Tony Award-Winning Broadway Producer

I'm on a mission to help 5000 shows get produced by 2025.

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All Upcoming Events

june, 2020

10jun12:00 pm1:00 pmTMS Coaching Call with Valerie Novakoff

15jun8:00 pm9:00 pmTMS Coaching Call with Eric C. Webb

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