Get Lost!

I got lost over the weekend while driving through Columbus, Ohio (I was scouting for a documentary that I’m producing and directing, but more on that later).

While I was trying to figure out how an interstate that ran East and West could all of sudden run East and South, I realized two things:

1.  I’m buying a GPS.

2.  Getting lost is OK.

Sure, I was an hour late and lost my voice screaming at the Lord of the Highways, but I still made it to my destination.

Whenever you’re lost, you always end up getting to your destination eventually, don’t you?  You never just pull over and say, “That’s it.  I’m done. I’m going to sit in my rental car until the scavengers pick over my bones.”  No, you stop, regroup, pick up a McDonald’s fountain Coke, ask for directions, get mad, listen to music, get mad again, call friends for help, and then finally, you make it.

Remember this the next time you’re writing or producing a project and are frustrated that you’re not reaching your deadline on time.

It’s OK to be late . . . The Lord of the Highways knows it took us 4 years to get Altar Boyz right and we took many a wrong turn along the way (remind me to tell you about the time that Abraham’s name was Leonard and Luke was addicted to Vicodin).

Sure we would have liked to have gotten there a lot faster, but making sure you get there is the most important part.

Just ask these guys how happy they were that they didn’t turn around and go home at some point during their 7 year trip.

Off-Broadway Shows Are Like Rowboats . . .

Ok, it’s time to announce the answer to the Off-Broadway  rowboat riddle!

Unfortunately there were no winners to my $100 challenge.  A couple came close, but here’s a longer version of what I was going for.

The analogy actually starts like this: Broadway shows are like giant steamships, kind of like the Titanic. They are so big, so cumbersome and require so much energy to get going, that once you actually get them in the water . . . there’s not much you can do to veer them from their destination. 

They are either going to hit the iceberg, or they won’t. Off-Broadway shows are more like rowboats.  You can turn them a lot quicker and with a lot less effort.  One quick row of an oar and you’re headed in a new direction. Unfortunately, they also sink a lot faster.  (In fact, 89% of all commercial Off-Broadway shows close within 6 months). Here are a couple of my favorite entries from some of the readers out there:

– “Off-Broadway is like a rowboat.  You only get somewhere after working hard to move yourself.”

– “Off-Broadway is like a rowboat.  The more people you have rowing in the same direction, the faster and farther you go.”

Thanks, guys.  And for being a runner up, I’m giving both of you iTunes gift cards!  Keep your eye on your inbox.

And I suggest you get this song with your first purchase.

New Businesses Are Like Children . . .

Children grow very quickly in the first few years of life.

And then, eventually, that growth slows down.

New businesses (and new shows) . . . are the same.

It’s easy to get them to grow during the first few years (or months if you’re talking about a show).  The hard part is to continue that growth, long after puberty is over.

Because otherwise, they just get old and die.

 

Life Is Like A Snow Globe!

Special thanks to my friends at  Travelzoo for the most inspired Christmas card of the year . . . and for giving me a new analogy to use (I love analogies.  Ask my staff how many times they’ve heard me say, “Off-Broadway is like a rowboat . . . “) 

The simile is simple.  Life (and business) is like a snow globe.  Sure, a snow globe is pretty to look at when sitting on your desk, but you only get the full potential from it when you shake it up

I’m going out to buy a snow globe today so I can be reminded of this every single day.

 

Back to my “Off-Broadway is like a rowboat” analogy.  $100 to anyone who can finish my thought.  Employees of Davenport Theatrical are not eligible (nice try, guys).

My Mission Statement And Yours.

Exceed expectations.

When you exceed people’s expectations, you become exceptional by definition.

And people, whether that’s your audience, your husband, your boss, etc. will have no choice but to talk about you and respect you.

In fact, exceeding expectations is the best way to prevent people from becoming your ex-audience, ex-husband, or ex-boss.

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