The Nominees for the 2015-2016 Broadway Marketing Awards are . . .

That’s right, Broadway people . . . there is another set of awards for last season still yet to give.  There are a ton of awards that celebrates the art of what we do . . . but there is only ONE set of awards that celebrate the business of what we do.

And that’s The Producer’s Perspective Broadway Marketing Awards!

I started these awards five years ago now because I saw how hard the folks at the advertising and marketing agencies in town worked . . . and how they constantly got all the blame when a show didn’t work commercially and none of the reward when it did.  While sure, there is nothing more important to the marketing of a show than the show itself, a great campaign gets the right butts in seats faster, and spreads the word of mouth that your show generates even faster than that.

So the Broadway Marketing Awards were created to put a little spotlight on the incredibly creative thinkers that sit in cubicles around the city, coming up with new ways to sell tickets to our shows.

If you’re new to the blog, let me explain what we did to come up with our list of nominees.

First, I assembled a cracker-jack team of nominators to comb through all the different marketing campaigns from the entire season. We’re talking print ads, TV commercials, websites, etc. It’s a lot of material.

And those nominators are:

Matt Britten, former Director of Marketing at NYMF and current Publisher of Broadway Briefing.  He constantly has his ear to the ground in order to keep the Briefing up to date.

Frank DiLella, Theater Reporter and Producer at NY1, reporting for the theater program ON STAGE, and the friendliest reporter on the beat.  He’s also very tall.

Jeremy Gerard, Arts Journalist and Broadway Columnist formerly of the New York Times, Variety, New York Magazine, Bloomberg News, and most recently, Deadline.com.  Now that’s a resume.

Jennifer Ashley Tepper, Broadway Historian, Director of Programming at 54 Below and Author of the Untold Stories of Broadway series.  She used to work for me, but she’s too fancy now.

These guys have come up with a list of “the best of the best,” and now you’re going to vote.

Why you?  Because you guys are not only students of the marketing of theater (like all of us should constantly be), but you’re also theatergoers.  And who better to judge how well shows are marketing themselves than the people to whom said marketing is directed?

But before we vote, let’s look at the categories.  They are:

Best Logo

Best Tagline

Best Website

Best Social Media

Best TV Commercial

Best Promotional Item/Swag

Best All-Around Campaign

Best Long-Running Campaign

 

Ok, my friends, it’s time to cast your vote in the only Broadway Business Awards there are.

Click here to see the nominees and cast your vote!

Polls close on Sunday, July 24th at midnight!  The winners will be announced on July 26th, right here on this blog!

Good luck everyone!!!

To see the nominees and to cast your vote click here.

 

(Got a comment? I love ‘em, so comment below! Email Subscribers, click here then scroll down to say what’s on your mind!)

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FUN STUFF:

– Need help getting your show off the ground?  Sign up for my seminar on 7/16 in Los Angeles!  Click here.

– Win 2 tickets to see A Chorus Line with the LA Philharmonic!  Click here.

– Get everything you need to help get your show off the ground when you join TheProducersPerspectivePro for free.  Join the club today.

Podcast Episode 80 – Tony Award-Winning Producers, Sue Frost and Randy Adams

In 2016, finding a good business partner may be harder than finding a good life partner.  Unfortunately, there’s no Tinder for business (hmmmm, new app idea anyone?).

And in an industry like ours, which can be more frustrating than trying to solve a Rubik’s Cube in the dark after someone has peeled off all the colored stickers, a great partner can help get you much further than you can get on your own . . . and faster.

This week’s guests are one of the finest examples of producing partnerships in our industry.  They’re smart, successful, and they do great work while having a great time and maintaining an even better reputation for being the nicest two Producers in town.

They won their Tony for Memphis (which they worked their butts off in developing, as you’ll hear) and have one of the most buzzed about shows coming into town next season.

Hear this three-way convo as we discuss:

  • What they learned from running non-profit theaters that helps them in the commercial world.
  • How they’ve learned to divide and conquer their producing duties.
  • Why the independent Producer is becoming an endangered species.
  • The challenges of producing Come From Away and why they are producing it anyway.
  • How they found each other, and how you can find a partner too.

Enjoy this terrific masterclass in partnerships!

Click here to listen.

Listen to it on iTunes here.  (And give me a rating, while you’re there!)

Download it here.

Click here to read the transcript!

 

(Got a comment? I love ‘em, so comment below! Email Subscribers, click here then scroll down to say what’s on your mind!)

– – – – –

FUN STUFF:

– Need help getting your show off the ground?  Sign up for my seminar on 7/16 in Los Angeles!  Click here.

– Win 2 tickets to see A Chorus Line with the LA Philharmonic!  Click here.

– Get everything you need to help get your show off the ground when you join TheProducersPerspectivePro for free.  Join the club today.

A Musical By Any Other Name is . . .

A script came into our e-submission pile the other day that got my attention.  Unfortunately, not in the “OMG – I gotta read this one right now” way.

The title page was perfectly formatted.  That wasn’t it.  But there was a little extra something on it . . . like a double garnish on a dinner plate.

Underneath the title and the author’s name, it said . . .

“A dark dramedy with music.”

Excuse me for a moment, but WTF is that?

It’s unique . . . for sure . . . and I know, I know, I preach that the key to success with your project is making it unique in some shape or form.

But let the work speak for itself. Don’t feel that you have to come up with a moniker that actually just confuses anyone picking it up . . . and more importantly, makes the reader think, “This writer actually doesn’t know what their piece is.”

Want to label your show before you submit?  Here’s what I suggest you choose from:

– Play
– Musical

And scene.

Ok, if you feel your targeted reader is only looking for a specific style of show, you could say:

– Comedy
– Drama

But that’s it.

And what about if your Play has some music in it?  I still think it’s a Play.  I don’t think people jump to read “plays with music” more than plays, so I’d go with Play or Musical.

Keep it simple.  Otherwise you may just confuse your reader . . . or worse, make the reader think you’re confused.

 

(Got a comment? I love ‘em, so comment below! Email Subscribers, click here then scroll down to say what’s on your mind!)

– – – – –

FUN STUFF:

– Need help getting your show off the ground?  Sign up for my seminar on 7/16 in Los Angeles!  Click here.

– Win a NYMF Premium Pass, worth $559!  Click here.

– Get everything you need to help get your show off the ground when you join TheProducersPerspectivePro for free.  Join the club today.

 

The (shockingly) worst thing you can hear about your show.

“Ken, guess what,” a client excitedly said before he could even get out a “hello” at the start of our last consult session.

“What’s up?”

“I just got my audience survey results back from the production of my show.  And it’s great news.”

“Do tell,” I said . . . and now I was getting excited because audience feedback gets me all tingly inside.

“Well, for over 95% of the audience, the production exceeded their expectations!  Isn’t that great?”

And that’s when my heart sunk.

Because exceeding an audience’s expectations ain’t such a great thing.

“What do you mean, Ken?  Doesn’t it mean they enjoyed the show?”

Yeah.  It does, I explained.  And that’s the good news.  But it also means that before they step into the theater, they have no clue what they’re about to see . . . and they aren’t expecting it to be anything to write home to Mama about.

Exceeding an audience’s expectations isn’t a creative problem.  It’s a marketing problem.  It means that however you are promoting your show, from the title to the blurb to the website, it’s not generating enough excitement with your potential buyer.  And, unfortunately, when audience’s expectations are low, that means that most of them won’t make a purchase.  People buy tickets to things that they expect to be good great.  They are buying entertainment, remember?  They want to be entertained.  And in 2016, with the cost of tickets as high as they are . . . entertaining an audience isn’t enough.  They want to be wowed.

How do I know this?  Because it happened to me on my very first show, Altar Boyz.  The good news was that we, like my client, discovered our “audience expectation” problem early enough to do a marketing reboot and get their excitement up for the performance, and then slightly exceed even that.

So do your research.  And find out not only what your audience thinks of the show itself.  But find out what they think of it before they even step into the theater.  That could tell you more about your potential than anything else.

 

(Got a comment? I love ‘em, so comment below! Email Subscribers, click here then scroll down to say what’s on your mind!)

– – – – –

FUN STUFF:

– Need help getting your show off the ground?  Sign up for my seminar on 7/16 in Los Angeles!  Click here.

– Win a NYMF Premium Pass, worth $559!  Click here.

– Get everything you need to help get your show off the ground when you join TheProducersPerspectivePro for free.  Join the club today.

 

5 Takeaways from my Get Your Show Off The Ground online Seminar.

Last week, we held my annual Get Your Show Off The Ground webinar, featuring four people with a project . . . and a mission to get that project off the ground.

Together, we batted about their situation, their assets, their challenges, and formulated an action plan to help get them to the next step of development and closer to making their dream a reality.

And, because it was online, a whole bunch of people got to audit/eavesdrop on the conversation and learn from it.

If you missed it, and want to hear the whole thing, including a Q&A from those auditors who had very unique situations of their own, join TheProducersPerspectivePro for a free 7-day trial.  The entire webinar is up in the archives, along with 30+ hours of other webinars.

To give you a sample of some of the stuff we talked about when I was asked questions about funding shows, getting producers to see those shows and more, here are Five Takeaways from the Webinar . . . in bite-sized form.

  1. Need a director, co-writer, or any type of collaborator?  Go see shows.  Rather than let the person speak in an interview, let the work speak for itself.  (Side Note – we’re in festival season, so this is a great time to hunt for emerging artists like yourself.)
  2. Want a Producer to see your show?  Think of them like customers that you want to buy your product.  Advertise to them in the same way a company would advertise any product . . . with multiple impressions in multiple ways.
  3. If someone really wants to do something, they’ll find the time no matter how busy they are.  If they say they’re too busy, “they’re just not that into you.”  So find someone else.
  4. If a potential investor isn’t a little bit skittish about investing in a Broadway or Off-Broadway show, something is wrong with them.  Your job is to be honest about the risks, and then explain why your show mitigates that risk.
  5.  The smaller the show, the longer you need to run in order to get the press to pay attention to you.

There’s a lot more juicy stuff from this webinar and the other two just like it in the archives section of ProducersPerspectivePro, so join Pro now to get access to it for free.

And if you’re interested in attending the more intensive, and more exclusive LIVE Get Your Show Off The Ground seminar, I have two coming on, one on each coast.  There are only eight spots for each session (and no audits) and both are more than half sold out.  So if you wanna come and get your project on the fast track, register now.

GET YOUR SHOW OFF THE GROUND – LA

Saturday, July 16th
3 PM- 6 PM PT
The Colony Theater, Burbank, CA
Click here to register now.

GET YOUR SHOW OFF THE GROUND – NYC

Saturday, September 24th
2 PM – 5 PM ET
Davenport Theatrical, NYC
Click here to register now.

“I’ve taken your “Get it off the ground” seminar twice, last year’s webinar and one “in-person” seminar. Your advice played a part in getting one show produced this coming season at a regional theater, with more in the offing. The second show, after a successful tryout using some of your suggestions, is inching its way through the precarious waters of off Broadway production.  So, thanks!” – Gary

“A great crash course in navigating the maze of producing commercial theatre. I really got a lot out of listening to everyone’s issues and hearing [Ken’s] feedback/solutions.”  – Phillip

“My enthusiasm for staging my show remains as strong as ever, and now thanks to you I have a ‘road map’ for making the dream come true.”  – Rich

 

(Got a comment? I love ‘em, so comment below! Email Subscribers, click here then scroll down to say what’s on your mind!)

– – – – –

FUN STUFF:

– Need help getting your show off the ground?  Sign up for my seminar on 7/16 in Los Angeles!  Click here.

– Win a NYMF Premium Pass, worth $559!  Click here.

– Get everything you need to help get your show off the ground when you join TheProducersPerspectivePro for free.  Join the club today.

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