Podcast Episode #233: 8 Shows A Week on Broadway

ESTIMATED LISTENING TIME OF THIS PODCAST EPISODE:  12 Minutes

CLICK HERE TO LISTEN:

And then, do these three things.

  1. FOLLOW The Producer’s Perspective on Apple Podcast (it’s FREE!)
  2. REVIEW the Podcast on Apple Podcast (it’s the biggest compliment you can give)
  3. SHARE this episode with your friends!

 

DESCRIPTION:

Ever wonder where the “8 Shows A Week” model came from?

I’ll tell you on this week’s episode, and I’ll also talk about how this fall, when Broadway returns, several shows may NOT perform 8 times a week.

Yep, Broadway may use the strategy that helped save Off-Broadway years ago . . . and pro-rate.

But will the unions allow it?  Listen in to hear more.

 

AFTER YOU LISTEN:

My mission is to get more people talking about the theater.  The more people talking about it, the more people who want to make it, perform it, support it, etc.  And that’s how theater not only survives, but thrives.

The biggest compliment you can give me is by sharing this podcast.

I thank you and the theater thanks you!

 

RECENT EPISODES:

May 14, 2021: What TheaterMakers Are Talking About This Week

From even more Broadway reopening dates and why Broadway is waiting to reopen until the fall to Indie Venues finally receiving their “Save our Stages” money and more . . . here’s what TheaterMakers were talking about this week . . .

 

1 – Hamilton, The Lion King and Wicked will return to Broadway on Sept. 14

Hamilton, The Lion King and Wicked are all set to return to Broadway this Fall! The “Big Three” were long-rumored to reopen the industry due to their popularity.

Read more: broadwaynews.com 

 

2 – EXPLAINER: Why Broadway is waiting until fall to reopen

The four-month long wait is explained. Producers and union leaders must reach agreements on all issues before shows open while also gauging their audiences back.

Read more: apnews.com

 

3- SBA Expects ‘Save Our Stages’ Money to Finally Reach Indie Venues Next Week.

Indie venues have been struggling to keep afloat since the pandemic began more than 14 months ago. They have received no aid thus far, news states the payments will begin starting next week.

Read more: variety.com 

 

4 – Hollywood Bowl reserves 85% of seats for vaccinated guests. Everything you need to know.

Want a seat at this year’s Hollywood Bowl? Get vaccinated! The remainder of the tickets will be reserved for those showing proof of a negative COVID-19 test within 72 hours of a given performance and masks will be required for all patrons.

Read more: latimes.com

 

5 – Cut the intermission, please. Why I hope the pandemic ends a theatrical tradition.

It’s hard to believe after the lockdown, people will want to maximize their time indoors. Will this pose an issue on the theatrical tradition of a 10-15 minute intermission? Or will intermission be of that of the past, moving towards uninterrupted performances?

Read more: latimes.com 

 

Fun on a Friday:

If you’ve been following the Bridgerton Musical trend on TikTok, you may have seen this new cover with Darren Criss (Hedwig and the Angry Inch, How To Succeed In Business Without Really Trying).

@abigailbarlowwwSurprise!! @darrencriss  is on tiktok and we burn for him. #bridgertonmusical @emilythebear♬ original sound – Abigail Barlow

 

 

Want to be part of an (free) online community of #theatermakers? Join 750+ theatermakers here

For Producers Only. (Quick favor needed.)

This one is for Producers. Only.

Whether you’re a Producer (or want to be) of other people’s work.

Or whether you’re a Producer (or want to be) of your own work.

This one is for you.

If you are not a Producer or never, ever, want to be, you can stop reading now.

Ok? Just us Producers now? Good.

See, I’ve been doing a lot of thinking about Producing Theater lately. Yep, even more than usual. That means, I’m not doing much of anything else these days!

I started this blog 14 freakin’ years ago with the goal of helping people produce shows (whether their own or other people’s). And now, we’re at such a pivotal point in the history of producing, with so many questions floating around out there, I am going back to those roots. But with a new producer’s perspective, if you will.

Here’s where you come in.

I have an idea on how I can help break down what I believe is the best way to produce theatre in the 21st century and beyond. But before I put it together, I wanted to ask you just TWO questions so I can make sure I’m providing you, Producers, the answers you are looking for.

So, if you are a Producer, or want to be a Producer, click here to answer those two questions.

If you are not a Producer or don’t want to be a Producer, DO NOT click.

Oh, and if you know someone who is a Producer or wants to be, please forward this along to them. The more data I compile, the better the results will be. The better the results, the better the theater.

Click here. 2 questions. 2 minutes. Tops.

Yet ANOTHER thing we need to do before Broadway comes back.

The To-Do list continues to grow.

Last Saturday night after my kid went to sleep, I scooted down to my office to wrap up a bit more work.

Imagine my surprise when I discovered that Times Square was shut down.

If you missed the news, it was because there was a shooting. And, while none of the three bystanders were critically wounded, one was a four-year child.

I don’t remember the last time this happened. Maybe in the 90s when I got here.  When Times Square was a different place.

Anyone who has been to Times Square over the past year knows that is a different place again. I’ve seen drug deals in front of the Belasco Theater. I’ve seen a drinking-out-of-the-bottle-cocktail party in front of The Marquis. I’ve seen more homeless who need help than ever before.

In other words, I’ve seen a Times Square that is not exactly what tourists are going to want to flock to when they can.

And after all the momentum we built up last week? Well, it takes just one incident like the one over the weekend, to move back three spaces and lose a turn.

We’ve got a lot to do to come back. We’ve got Covid-19 safety policies to put into place. We’ve got equality policies to put into place. We’ve got shows to put up.  And audiences to convince to come back.

And, now, we need to remember that one of the most important factors in a brick-and-mortar industry’s success?

Location.

Location.

Lo. Ca. Tion.

Our political leaders have come through for us in many ways throughout this pandemic, and I’m thankful for their support. And now we need them to focus their efforts on restoring the beacon of light and energy that is Times Square.

And we need to help too. The Broadway theaters are the big citizens on this block.  We need to flex our muscles and do our part.

See, Times Square used to scare people away. I know, because I was one of them. I used to walk around it or bike through it after I escaped two muggings and defrauded out of $100 in 1991.

And for the sake of Broadway’s comeback, we can’t let that happen again.

That’s why this year’s NYC Mayoral race is more important than ever.

I’m not going political, don’t worry.  And not suggesting a candidate to you at all.  But if you are an NYC resident, I will suggest that you vote . . . and vote for the candidate that you believe will restore the epicenter of our city, and possibly the world, to the glory that it was.  Even if that means tourist-packed sidewalks again.

Learn about the candidates running for Mayor here. 

Podcast Episode #232: How shows get the green light on Broadway versus Hollywood.

ESTIMATED LISTENING TIME OF THIS PODCAST EPISODE:  12 Minutes

CLICK HERE TO LISTEN:

And then, do these three things.

  1. FOLLOW The Producer’s Perspective on Apple Podcast (it’s FREE!)
  2. Rate/Review the Podcast on Apple Podcast (it’s the biggest compliment you can give)
  3. SHARE this episode with your friends!

DESCRIPTION:

Looking to get a show produced on Broadway or Off-Broadway?  Or curious how a show gets the green light in the theater biz, as opposed to our (sort-of) sister industry in Hollywood?

Listen in.  I break it down.

 

AFTER YOU LISTEN:

My mission is to get more people talking about the theater.  The more people talking about it, the more people who want to make it, perform it, support it, etc.  And that’s how theater not only survives, but thrives.

The biggest compliment you can give me is by sharing this podcast.

I thank you and the theater thanks you!

X