April 9, 2021: What TheaterMakers Are Talking About This Week

From Actors’ Equity releasing new protocols for fully vaccinated productions to the first performance in a Broadway theater since March 2020, here’s what TheaterMakers were talking about this week . . . 

 

1 – Broadway Reopened. For 36 Minutes. It’s a Start.

This event showcased the dancer Savion Glover and the actor Nathan Lane, where they performed before a masked audience of 150 scattered across one of the biggest Broadway Theaters, St. James. This event was the first such experiment since the coronavirus pandemic caused to close on March 12, 2020. It’s the first step home — the first of many,” said Jordan Roth. “This is not, ‘Broadway’s back!’ This is ‘Broadway is coming back!’ And we know it can because of this.”

Read more: nytimes.com

 

2 – Wear a Mask, Avoid Intermission: Lessons from the Covid Think Tank Town Hall 

The rapid rollout of the Covid-19 vaccine has increased new and improved ideas and optimism about indoor theater swiftly reopening in the U.S. In addition to the vaccine, testing, enhanced theater ventilation, and continued mask-wearing is also the key to gradually restarting the industry. Their plan for reopening? “Plan now,” Dr. Smith said. “Even if you don’t have a go-live date…There are so many layers. There’s a lot to think about and to talk about.”

Read More: broadwayjournal.com

 

3 – COVID Passports: Entertainment venues air concerns over plans

The government has said Covid-status certificates could be used at theatres, nightclubs, and festivals starting in June. They could be used to prove vaccination or testing. They will be trialing this at events at venues in Liverpool, as well as sporting events. 

Read more: bbc.com 

 

4 – Actors’ Equity releases new safety protocols for vaccinated productions

The new guidelines come after the backlash from the community about previous protocols. Absent from these protocols are the requirements of private transportation to and from theaters, as well as the need for Plexiglas and 12 feet of distance on stage. Those regulations are still included in documents for indoor theater productions without a fully vaccinated workforce.

Read More: broadwaynews.com

 

5 – Neil Diamond Bio-Musical Sets Sights on Broadway

A Beautiful Noise is set to run for four weeks at the Emerson Colonial Theater Boston in 2022, the show’s producers, Ken Davenport and Bob Gaudio announced on Tuesday. They plan to bring the production to Broadway following that run.

Read more: nytimes.com

 

FUN ON A FRIDAY! Josh Groban’s New Song

Bush’s Beans and Josh Groban teamed up to give the bean the ballad it deserves.

 

 

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I got great advice from this tech billionaire.

It’s not a secret that one of the places I look to learn the secrets of theater-making . . . is outside the theater biz.

First, by examining what other industries do, I get a perspective that I don’t have.

Second, a product is a product is a product. And even though our product is an art, we build it, market it, and sell it in the same way as everything else.

Here’s a story that reminded me of that basic truth . . . from the tech space.

In February, Whitney Wolfe Herd became the youngest female billionaire on the planet.

And she did it by breaking into one of the most competitive markets around . . . online dating.

Whitney invented Bumble, the dating app where women get to make the first move.

Now, whenever anyone breaks through ceilings like Whitney, the first thing I do is jump up and down for them and tell as many people as I can. (Purpose of this blog #1.)

Second, I try to learn from them, and how they bust through the barrier. . .  and then tell as many people about that so they can learn from it too. (Purpose of this blog #2).

And what I learned from the many articles I read about her success is all in this perfect little quote. When a reporter asked her why she made Bumble, she said . . .

“I’ve truly just always tried to build what I wish existed,”

Whitney didn’t follow some fancy business plan. She didn’t pay attention to algorithms. She didn’t listen to focus groups.

She thought about what would she would like to use, and what her friends would also like to use, and she built it.

And she made a billion dollars.

To put this in theatermakin’ terms?  Whitney’s quote is the same as saying . . .

I produce shows I want to see.

I write shows I want to see.

I direct shows I want to see.

I act in shows that I want to see.

Etc.

The cool thing about following this mission is two-fold:

1. You can’t go wrong. If the show doesn’t work? You got to see it. And you wanted to see it. I hang all the posters of my shows on my office wall, even the ones that didn’t “succeed.”  And they ALL make me smile. Because I wanted to see them.

2.  You have good instincts. If YOU want to see something. Odds are other people do too. You are your OWN focus group. This is derivative of the Peter Lynch philosophy of investing . . . investing in what you use every day. You are investing your time, creativity, money . . . into something you WANT to use every day. And I’d be if you want to see that show, there are a lot more people where you come from

So take heed to the tech billionaire’s advice when you’re making theater. And I look forward to hearing how you break through your barrier.

And if you want to see more about what other TheaterMakers think about this, click here!

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If you want help breakin’ through, watch one of the masterclasses on everything from producing to writing to directing and more.

 

The World Premiere of The Neil Diamond Musical will be . . .

It was almost a year ago to the day.
We were about to announce that our Neil Diamond Musical that has been in development for a few years, would have its world premiere in Boston in 2020.

And then, it became clear to us, and to the rest of the world, that this pandemic wasn’t going to cooperate with anyone’s plans.

So we’ve been waiting.  And waiting.  And . . .

Now . . . finally . . . I’m thrilled to announce that the show with a book by four-time Academy Award nominee Anthony McCarten will have its world premiere in Boston at the Colonial Emerson Theater (where I grew up going to shows), in July of 2022.

Oh.   And the title!  Well, it’s called . . . A Beautiful Noise.

You can see the exact dates and sign up to get exclusive access to tickets here.  (And in the spirit of the season, look around and see if you can find a little Easter Egg hidden on the site, just for you.)

You’ll hear a lot more from me about the show in the coming months.  We’ve all been so starved for theater, I plan on sharing a lot.  🙂  So follow me here to see photos and videos along the way.

But right now, all that we wanted to do was put our Sweet Caroline of a flag in the Beantown ground and say. . . we’re coming . . . we’re coming to America Boston!  And THEN America!

See more here.

Podcast Episode #227: What TheaterMakers Need To Know About Social Media Marketing in 2021

ESTIMATED LISTENING TIME OF THIS PODCAST EPISODE:  23 MINUTES

 

CLICK HERE TO LISTEN

  • FOLLOW The Producer’s Perspective on Apple Podcast (it’s FREE to do so!)
  • Rate/Review on Apple Podcast
  • FOLLOW on Broadway Podcast Network’s FREE iOS app
  • Share this episode with your friends!

 

DESCRIPTION

Two facts are certain:

  1.  If you’re a theatermaker (or a person with a pulse), you need to be on social media.
  2.  The rules of how to make your message stand out changes every five sec . . . oh, there we go again!

How do you learn about what’s working now?  Two ways, you jump in the deep end and try a whole bunch of @#$%.

Or you listen to this podcast and let people like me who recently tried a whole bunch of @#$% tell you what we learned.

Which was a ton.

If you are planning on using social media to market yourself or your show, this one is a must-listen.

April 2, 2021: What TheaterMakers Are Talking About This Week

April 2, 2021: What TheaterMakers Are Talking About This Week

From Diana the Musical announcing their Netflix release date AND their Broadway return date, to the future of casting on Broadway in Phantom of the Opera, and a possible Game of Thrones musical, here’s what TheaterMakers were talking about this week . . .

 

1 – Diana Musical Sets Netflix Run — and Broadway Opening Night

For the first time, a filmed version of a Broadway stage production will be out to stream before the musical even opens. “Diana,” was shot last September in the Longacre Theater, without an audience. The show is set to begin streaming on Netflix on October 1. They’ve also announced the opening on Broadway beginning two months later on December 1.

Read more: nytimes.com

 

2 – Game of Thrones Play in the Works for Broadway, Will Revive Iconic Characters (Exclusive)

The play’s official description reads, “Featuring many of the most iconic and well-known characters from the series, the production will boast a story centered around love, vengeance, madness and the dangers of dealing in prophecy, in the process revealing secrets and lies that have only been hinted at until now.”

Read More: hollywoodreporter.com

 

3 – First 150,000 spectators attended the musical CHESS in Moscow

CHESS was produced and opened during difficult conditions under COVID-19 restrictions, quarantine, and isolation laws. Even with all of the restrictions, the Russian production of CHESS in Moscow became the second longest-running production of CHESS in the world, after London.

Read more: moscrow-broadway.ru

 

4 – What Do Australian Theatre Critics Think of Hamilton?

The Australian staging of Hamilton officially opened March 27 at Sydney Lyric Theatre, making it the first and only staging of the Tony Award, Olivier Award, Grammy Award, Pulitzer Prize award-winning musical currently running in the wake of the coronavirus shutdown.

Read more: playbill.com

 

5 – What The Phantom of the Opera‘s Open Casting Call Means for Broadway’s Return                   In response to the wave of injustice and racial discrimination at the start of the pandemic, Broadway leaders have decided to make changes in their productions, within representation and equity on stage. A change in language in the casting call does not guarantee anything but shows a future filled with change.

Read More: playbill.com

 

BONUS! Saturday Night Live: Choreographers
A dance rehearsal gets interrupted when the choreographers (Maya Rudolph, Kenan Thompson) refuse to work with each other.

https://youtu.be/04zG-QoK9C8

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