Cry-Baby opened last night. So, did HE like it?

Only one way to find out:  www.DidHeLikeIt.com

Talkin’ Broadway stops them from Talkin’.

The infamous and original broadway web chatter site, talkinbroadway.com, issued a statement recently, letting all their chatterazi know that they no longer will publish “reviews/reports of dress rehearsals/gypsy run-throughs.”

They’ve got good intentions here.  But they’re making a mistake.  As I learned from social media guru, Warren Ackeman at Affinitive, the more you tighten the reins on your online audience, the more likely those reins are going to break.  Does TB really think their passionate peeps won’t find another place to chat?  They’re gonna scurry to find one fast.  Like roaches when you turn on the light.

I’m sure there are producers all over town celebrating Talking Bway’s new policy.  But that just means they’re not confident in what’s gonna be on that stage.

You can’t produce with fear about what people are going to say, no matter who they are or what sites they visit or when they come.

And, remember, if your show is fantastic, you’ll WANT those people talking about your show as early as you can get them.

So Talkin’ Broadway, thanks for trying to protect us from the bullies.  But don’t worry, we can take care of ourselves.

And if we can’t, we’re definitely in the wrong business.

BTW, if any Talking Broadway regulars are reading this and want to write reviews/reports of dress rehearsals/gypsy run-throughs, might I suggest BroadwaySpace.com.  😉

Another pricing post. Don’t “cry” – this one is only $54!

I couldn’t help but continue with my pricing motif when I saw the Cry Baby marquis this weekend advertising “All Tickets for Previews Only $54!”  (The show is set in 1954. Get it?  1954.  $54.)

The hopeful Producers of Hairspray II are betting that this reduced price (about the same as what the price would have been at the TKTS booth) will pull in more of an audience during the ever important early weeks, when a show’s expenses are high and grosses are low.

But will it work?

By slashing their prices across the board, they have eliminated the consumer’s option for choice, which breaks my Kardinal Kenism:

There is always someone who wants to fly first class.

First class may seem out of reach for most of us, and a full price ticket might seem too expensive for an unproven show in previews for most of us as well, but data shows there is always someone who will buy it, no matter what the price is.  They just want “the best.”  Dance of the Vampire, Moose Murders, Carrie . . . all of the biggest flops in history had full price ticket buyers during previews.  Stupid ones, but still.  My opinion?  Just take the money.

The other problem with across the board pricing strategy is that your
TKTS price is proportionally adjusted.  So, the Producers of Cry Baby aren’t only losing income from the potential $115 ticket buyer who is now
paying $54, but they’re also losing money from the people who would have
paid $57.50 at the booth (50% of $115) who are now going to pay $27 (and remember – at the TKTS booth, you don’t see the actual prices display . . . only 25%, 35% or 50% off, so the customer thinks they are all the same).

The Producers of Baby are smart people.  They understand the above theory.  But obviously they believe two things:

  • They believe they are going to sell approximately 2x the number of tickets from this promotion than they would have sold using traditional pricing.  Even if they sell the same, they will have double the butts in the seats.  And more bodies = more word of mouth.
  • The public discount will allow them to spend less on advertising so they can avoid certain email blasts, direct mail, etc. which reduces their overall expenses.

Time and Variety will tell how this theory works, but if I were playing my favorite game, I would have made a different call.

I would have priced it more traditionally, based on my first class rule above, and because I don’t believe that the price is that remarkable of a call to action.

Then I would price the entire house for just the first preview at $19.54.

That’s a price worth talking about.  And it would have gotten the most people in to the see the show early, so they would hopefully stop talking about price.

And start talking about the show.

BroadwaySpace.com In The NY Times!

BroadwaySpace.com was the top and tail in a story about Broadway websites in today’s New York Times.

Read the full article here!

A picture is worth so much more than a thousand words.

I bet you thought this post was about the strike, didn’t you?

Why wouldn’t you?  The first thing you looked at was the picture, right?

And who could blame you for looking at the picture first.  Pictures are pretty. They have color.  They tell a story very, very quickly and with little effort required. But this post is not about the strike.

See, I was looking through my previous posts and I noticed that they had one thing in

common:  no pictures.

I have committed the cardinal sin of maintaining a web site and for this I am very,

very sorry. So, the community service that the blog gods are forcing me to do is to share the following with you:

All of the websites that I have managed and maintained have had one thing in common. The most popular page on all of the websites was the photo gallery. Always.  Without fail.  Photos are what visitors to websites want. 

So if you have a website for your show or your product (even if it’s a MySpace page), make sure you have more pictures than you can take.  And update them constantly.

More pictures mean more visitors staying on your site for more time. Who could ask for anything more when marketing on the web? 


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