The “Will It Recoup” Winner!

In case you haven’t noticed, summer is already winding down.  And that means the tourists are starting to head out of town, a few shows will be closing, and . . . it also means that it’s time to announce the winner of the first ever Broadway Fantasy Investment Game!

Back in freezing February, we looked at 9 limited run revivals and tried to determine which one(s) would make its money back.
Here are the final results of what did and didn’t make money this Spring, based on what has been announced in the press, what hasn’t been announced in the press, and a few inside sources:
33 Variations – NO
Impressionism – NO
Blithe Spirit – YES
God of Carnage – YES
Exit The King – NO
Irena’s Vow – NO
Reasons to be Pretty – NO
Mary Stuart – NO
Norman Conquests – NO

So who won?

Well, we had FIVE people pick the winners/losers perfectly.  Yep, this one came down to a tie breaker.

And the winner of the brand new iPhone 3S (which is awesome, by the way), is . . .

TOM LOMBARDI!

Congrats, Tom.  Your gift certificate will be in your inbox shortly!

A big shout out to the other four readers who would have made a bundle this Spring:  Michael Height, Ari, Dave Beef (something tells me that’s not his real name) and Megan.  You guys have got the goods.

And for the rest of you, don’t beat yourself up.  A huge majority picked at least one of the recoupers, and that’s pretty dang good.

In fact, if you were among the over 25% that thought that God of Carnage would recoup its investment, you’d be sitting pretty, because that investment would have paid for some of your other losers and then some.

Congrats, Tom!

We interrupt this blog to bring you the following recoupment report.

Put a check in the win column, and put a check in the mail, because . . .

Blithe Spirit has recouped!

If you haven’t yet seen the show, go.  I mean, there are only two women in the world who have won five Tony awards in their lifetime, and only one of them is currently at the Shubert Theater.

How many chances do you get to see a master of their craft at work?  Seeing Angela in this role is like watching Babe Ruth hit a homer or watching Tiger Woods tee off.  There are not too many people that can do what these masters do . . . and not too many chances to see them live.

Consider yourself lucky.  You’ve got eight more chances to see Angela dance around the stage as Madame Arcati.

Need a discount?   Click here.  But hurry.  With only a week left, the good seats are going fast.

I’m going to take leave of you now so I can go do a dance of my own.  It’s called The Recoupment Dance!  It involves a lot of jumping, one cartwheel, and an occasional Robot (wait for it).

My Tony Award Predictions

Ok, here they are, as promised:  my predicts for what the 800 or so Tony Voters will select as the winners of this year’s Tony Awards.  To clarify, this is not what I think should win, nor is it what I necessarily voted for myself, but rather this is who I expect to be standing on that stage on Sunday night.

Drumroll, puhleeze.

BEST PLAY:  GOD OF CARNAGE

The French can be snooty and smelly, but neither of those adjectives apply to French writer Yasmine Reza or her work of “Art.”  Her star-studded, super-grossing ($900k for a play?), smart yet accessible comedy (complete with barf jokes) will win out over the primary competition, Labute’s reasons to be pretty.

BEST MUSICAL:  BILLY ELLIOT

The Best Musical landscape is similar to Best Play.  Another import, this one British, squares off against a smaller, perhaps more challenging, American musical, Next to Normal.  Unfortunately for all you patriots out there, the British and Billy will take the big prize of the evening.  And seeing the 147 kids in the show storm the stage at the end will be a sight to see, so stay up!

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE:  TOM KITT & BRIAN YORKEY, NEXT TO NORMAL

The Americans strike back here, as N2N deservedly picks up the score trophy.  This award also comes with a note from many voters that reads, “Sorry we didn’t vote for you for Best Musical.  We loved your show, but . . .”

BEST BOOK OF A MUSICAL:  LEE HALL, BILLY ELLIOT

For awhile, I thought N2N would pull a Urinetown or Falsettos split (and take both score and book while giving up the big prize to a more commercial choice, Millie and Crazy for You, respectively), as the voters like to reward writers of challenging work.  The upset of the night would be if the voters tipped their hat to Hunter Bell and the TOS crew with an award.  But frankly, I just don’t think enough of them saw the show last fall to make that happen.

BEST REVIVAL OF A PLAY:  THE NORMAN CONQUESTS

Great revivals were like foreclosures this year . . . on every block!  (Too soon?)  This category would have been even tougher to pick, had the nominators not forgotten about some of the fall shows (specifically, The Seagull).  Norman gets the girl in this category, partly for its great production, and partly because of the degree of difficulty in staging three British comedies and running them in rep  (I’d also bet that a bunch of voters voted for Norman while only seeing one of the plays.)

BEST REVIVAL OF A MUSICAL:  HAIR

The Most Improved Show award goes to Hair this year.  Luckily, West Side doesn’t need it with its Wicked-like grosses (it’s a revival!).

BEST SPECIAL THEATRICAL EVENT:  LIZA’S AT THE PALACE

Obviously, I’m praying that I’m wrong with this one.  Will’s got a chance, thanks to the phenomenal success of the run and because it’s fresh in everyone’s memory.  But a Hollywood A-lister bringing down Broadway royalty seems like a long shot to me, so I’m putting my money on the safe bet. That’s ok.  I’m still happy having put my investors money on the other guy.  🙂

BEST PERFORMANCE BY A LEADING ACTOR IN  A PLAY:  GEOFFREY RUSH, EXIT THE KING

This is the easiest to call, which is unfortunate for Raul Esparza, who deserves to have a couple of trophies on his mantle.  But God knows, he’ll have more chances to get up on that stage, as I don’t see him making an exit anytime soon.

BEST PERFORMANCE BY A LEADING ACTRESS IN  A PLAY:  MARCIA GAY HARDEN, GOD OF CARNAGE

There is a 60 second section in God of Carnage where Marcia doesn’t utter a word.  But you can practically read her thoughts as if they were written in a bubble above her head.  She wins for that moment alone.

BEST PERFORMANCE BY A LEADING ACTOR IN  A MUSICAL: THE THREE BILLYS, BILLY ELLIOT

Tatum O’Neal, Daisy Eagan , Anna Paquin.  Voters love to give a kid a trophy.  And the only thing better than one kid nominee  . . . is three.

BEST PERFORMANCE BY A LEADING ACTRESS IN  A MUSICAL:  ALICE RIPLEY, NEXT TO NORMAL

In an example of the Hollywood Rain Man syndrome (where playing a challenged individual of any type, physical or mental, gives you a boost at award time), Alice will win for her terrific portrayal of the challenged mom in N2N.

BEST PERFORMANCE BY A FEATURED ACTOR IN  A PLAY:  JOHN GLOVER, WAITING FOR GODOT

This one could also be called the Best Spitter Award (previous winners would have included Jonathan Groff in Spring Awakening).  John wins for saying the most with the least to actually say.

BEST PERFORMANCE BY A FEATURED ACTRESS IN  A PLAY:  ANGELA LANSBURY, BLITHE SPIRIT

There is currently only one woman who has won five Tony Awards.  After Sunday, there will be two.  Watch for the standing ovation when Angela takes the stage.

BEST PERFORMANCE BY A FEATURED ACTOR IN  A MUSICAL:  CHRISTOPHER SIEBER, SHREK

The guy is on his knees for the whole show for Shrek’s sake!

BEST PERFORMANCE BY A FEATURED ACTRESS IN  A MUSICAL:  HAYDEN GWYNNE, BILLY ELLIOT

Hayden hits a trifecta here:  Outer Critics, Drama Desk, Tony.  That much momentum can’t be stopped.

BEST DIRECTION OF A PLAY:  MATTHEW WARCHUS, GOD OF CARNAGE

For awhile, I thought Matthew’s two noms would split his vote, but then I saw I took another look at God’s grosses ($900k for a play?), and realized that he would take the Tony on the back of the show’s success, and deservedly so.

BEST DIRECTION OF A MUSICAL:  STEPHEN DALDRY, BILLY ELLIOT

For awhile, I was calling a bit of an upset here, because without Diane, Hair would not be the hit it is.  But at the end of the day, I think the majority of voters will give it to Daldry for the sheer magnitude of the work he did in directing Billy.

BEST CHOREOGRAPHY:  PETER DARLING, BILLY ELLIOT

When dancing is a major part of your plot, you better win choreography!  Hands and toes down, Darling is the winner.

BEST ORCHESTRATIONS:  MARTIN KOCH, BILLY ELLIOT

Big show + big score = Tony.

BEST SCENIC DESIGN OF A PLAY:  DEREK MCCLANE, 33 VARIATIONS

The other nominees in this category are mostly stationery sets, so Derek’s “musical” set wins.

BEST SCENIC DESIGN OF A MUSICAL:  IAN MACNEIL BILLY ELLIOT

They had to drill a giant hole in the basement of the theater to allow for that house to come up through the ground, like a man from a mine, but it’ll earn this man a Tony.

BEST COSTUME DESIGN OF A PLAY:  DALE FERGUSON, EXIT THE KING

Whenever Kings and Queens are in a play, the odds for winning a costume award jumps up tremendously.  Normally, I’d say give this one to Mary Stuart, but I’m going with Dale, for the absurdist suit of armor.

BEST COSTUME DESIGN OF A MUSICAL:  TIM HATLEY, SHREK

Costume awards go to designs that stand out, and in a field of nominations that include one show about the 60s and two shows about the 80s, Shrek certainly stands out.

BEST LIGHTING DESIGN OF A PLAY:  HUGH VANSTONE, MARY STUART

On Broadway, “rain” is an electrician and a lighting designer’s job. It rains in Mary Stuart. And that’s cool and memorable. So it’ll rain a Tony on Hugh.

BEST LIGHTING DESIGN OF A MUSCIAL:  RICK FISHER, BILLY ELLIOT

With the design awards, sometimes bigger is better.  The bigger the show, the bigger the budget, and the more toys the designers have to play with.  In this case, bigger is Billy.

BEST SOUND DESIGN OF A PLAY:  RUSSELL GOLDSMITH, EXIT THE KING

This is a tough one.  Your guess is as good as mine.  I went with the sounds of a dying king.  Creepy.

BEST SOUND DESIGN OF A MUSICAL:  PAUL ARDITTI, BILLY ELLIOT

Paul will win for excellent work, yes, but also for a syndrome I call, “Tony By Association.”

So that’s it!  Make sure you tune in on Sunday to see how I do!  And don’t forget to make your picks on my Tony pool!  There is only 2 days left to play and win $500!  Click here.

If you’re not following me on Twitter, click here. Just like last year, I’ll be tweeting from my $900 seat (yep, that’s how it costs – crazy, huh?) and I’ll fill you in on everything that’s going on from inside Radio City, including the not-suitable for airing, in between commercial breaks stuff.

If you don’t yet have a place to watch – try Times Square!  The Tonys will be on the Big Screen!  With the new blocked off streets, it should be fun.  Tweet me from there if you go. I’d love to hear what the party is like.

Oh, one more prediction before I sign off:  during the telecast, I predict there will be two Jeremy Piven jokes.  🙂

Who is the opposite of Will Ferrell?

Just as Will Ferrell went on sale to the public yesterday (and it’s selling like you would expect it to, so get your tickets now), I signed on to produce another Broadway show:  Blithe Spirit,
starring Angela Lansbury (not to mention Rupert Everett, Christine
Ebersole, Simon Jones, and Jayne Atkinson) and directed by Michael
Blakemore.

If you think I’m nuts to do another show in this market, you’re not alone.  My mom, a proud but still smarting investor in 13, said.  “Why now?”

Simple, Momma.

There are always winning stocks in every market.  And there are always winning shows in any season.  Do you think all the people in the financial industry just stopped going to work when the market plummeted?  No.  The lifers looking for a career and not quick money, reassessed what was working, what was failing, and got back in the game, smarter than before.

It’s my job as a Producer to do the same thing as a mutual fund manager – to try and determine what shows are working now, and what will work in the future, both for myself and for my investors, and make recommendations accordingly.

And I believe that classics, comedies and stars with a dash of a “once-in-a-lifetime”, must-see event is what will stand out to the ticket-buying public.

To be honest, if you had asked me ten years ago if I ever would produce a revival of a 1941 Noel Coward comedy, I would have told you that I wouldn’t even go SEE a Coward comedy.

But times change. Tastes change.  Markets change.  Those same financial analysts weren’t buying alternative energy stocks 10 years ago, but I bet they are looking at that sector now.

The other reason I signed on to this show?

Because Angela Lansbury and Will Ferell are as opposite as Jeremy Piven and George Washington.

As I looked over my show portfolio, there was one audience that I
didn’t have covered.  And just like you wouldn’t develop a stock
portfolio without some exposure to the international markets, I wanted
a show that gave me exposure to the “traditional theatergoer” market.
And one of the most successful comedies in theatrical history and this
star-studded cast including a Broadway legend certainly qualifies.  (I
used this theory as a reason to pick up Speed The Plow last fall to balance my exposure to the musical market in 13, and that worked well).

It all makes sense, right?  Will it work?

Stay tuned to find out.  And feel free to tell me if you think I’m crazy or not.

And Mom?  What do you say?  Are you investing in both Will and Blithe?

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