My new iTunes Terms and Conditions are how many pages?

How many of you have iTunes?

Now, how many of you have EVER read the iTunes Terms and Conditions that pop up and require you to click “I ACCEPT” before you’re able to download Autotune’s “Bed Intruder Song.”

The last time the T&Cs appeared on my iPhone, they were 55 pages long!  Ok, that’s in iPhone pages, but still!

Who’s reading this stuff?  Anybody?  They could have a “you must eat brussels sprouts” clause buried deep on page 37, and I’d have no veggin’ clue.

Obviously, me not reading an agreement or me eating brussels sprouts is not a good thing.

So, are these super-long agreements over simple issues the result of ambitious self-preserving lawyers?  Or is it the fault of overly litigious consumers who hires lawyers in an effort to make a quick buck?

The irony of some of these contracts is that they were written in an effort to protect the consumer, producer, artist, etc. . . . but because most consumers, producers, artists, etc aren’t reading them, and may make decisions without reading them, they are actually less protected.

Take aways?

1.  Read your agreements.

2.  When creating contracts, ask for simple, straightforward agreements from your lawyers and reps that address the practical issues you expect to face.

3.  Hire help if you don’t want to read your agreements, or don’t understand them.  $500 now could save you 10x that later.

4.  Yes, eat your brussels sprouts.

How to make money on YouTube . . . with Broadway?

An interesting article appeared in the technology section of The Times this week about YouTube, and how Google expects their 1.65 billion dollar baby to be profitable this year.

How?

Well, they made friends with the enemy.

The TV and film industries have been fighting with YouTube since the site came out.  As fast as videos of copyrighted material could go up, another lawsuit would be filed.  Google claimed innocence (!), but eventually agreed to police their backyard as much as possible.

Well, those bitter enemy industries are now the closest of friends.

Why?

Like just about everything else, it’s all about money.

The TV and movie producers realized that trying to stop the uploading of their content to a site like YouTube was pointless.  It was gonna keep happening anyway, so why pay those lawyers to keep fighting it.  They also realized that a lot of those clips were doing a lot more good than harm, by providing free media to promote their products.

And most importantly, Google started running ads on their copyrighted videos, and sharing the proceeds.

Suddenly, the lawsuits stopped.

Funny, how a little cash calms the nerves.

So, let’s recap:

Fans put up copyrighted videos.  They get pulled down.  Google pays owners of material, and all is ok.

Huh.  The first two-thirds of that three sentence story sounds familiar, doesn’t it?

Think YouTube would ever pay off the owners of the material of Broadway shows by sharing in ad revenue that appears on each clip?

And would that make it ok?

Unlike film or TV, we’ve got quality issues to deal with.  A performance of Mad Men is always the same, no matter how many times it is played.  A performance of Patti Lupone doing Gypsy . . . well, one performance might be HUGELY different from the next.

I don’t expect YouTube to open its purse to Broadway any time soon, but it would be nice, wouldn’t it?  Because as our costs escalate, it is becoming more and more essential that Broadway shows find ancillary forms of revenue to defray those rising expenses.

Read the article here.

5 MORE Takeaways from the Get Your Show Off The Ground Seminar.

Last Saturday, another great group of super passionate producers, writers, artists and more woke up early and spent the day with me and the other entrepreneurial artists who signed up for my Get Your Show Off The Ground Seminar.

We had a blast.

We heard about all sorts of projects at various stages of development.  We talked about finding and signing collaborators, how to wear multiple hats on multiple projects, and yes, you guessed it, we talked about how to raise all those important funds.  And everyone walked away with a to-do list that they were psyched to check off.

While it’s impossible to recreate the energy of the room in a blog, I thought I’d do what I did after the last seminar, and post five simple takeaways that resonated with the group, that will hopefully resonate with you.

  • Creating experiential entertainment has never been more important than it is today.
  • The nicer the theater you put your show in, the higher the expectations from your audience and the press, will be.
  • Your agents and your lawyers work for you.  You do not work for them.
  • Developing scripts can be like sick children.  And if your kid isn’t getting better, don’t stick with your one doctor.  Take him/her to the best doctor you can afford.
  • Just because your show doesn’t belong on Broadway, doesn’t mean it doesn’t belong.

There was a ton of other great stuff that came out of the seminar, and so much of it came from the participants themselves!  These seminars have turned into great collaborative think tanks of some of the most exciting and emerging theatrical minds I’ve seen.  Thanks for being so awesome, guys.

If you’d like to participate in one of my seminars, sign up today by clicking here. The next seminar will be on Saturday, November 13th. (The timing is ideal for all of you post-festival peeps curious about what to do AFTER the festival.)  FYI, I’ve modified the structure a bit to make the seminar more efficient, but that also means that there are only 12 spots available.  These spots will go fast, so register today.

Click here for more info and we’ll see you there!

SIGN UP BELOW TO NEVER MISS A BLOG

X