Ticketmaster tackles the subject of their fees, on their brand new blog.

There’s a new voice in the theatrical blogosphere.

And it has a market cap of over a billion buckaroos.

The recently merged Ticketmaster unveiled their own blog a couple of weeks ago, written by their very own CEO, “Nathan” (he signed the blog by his first name only).  Their first (and so far only) post begins with the sentence, “We get it – you don’t like service fees.”

Master-of-the-Nation (my pet name for the new company formed by the Ticketmaster/LiveNation merger) continues to explain that they are going to use their blog to help educate the consumer on the fact and fiction of e-commerce, how fees are going to be presented in the future, and why the fees are what they are (news flash: that billion dollar market cap has something to do with it).

While they’re a little late to the explanation party, I gotta give props for their desire to shed a little light on their world, and for the changes they are about to implement, which are a direct response to the comments they’ve heard from their consumers (they have frightening data demonstrating the drop-off-rate when a customers sees those fees).

But the line that made me fall in love was this . . .

This [new] user experience mirrors what you see across the web from leaders in their field – Amazon, Apple, Expedia, Zappos and more. It’s not complicated, it’s just the right thing to do.

We are the leader in the industry, and so we are accountable for taking the initiative to drive industry change. We take that responsibility very seriously, and at the new Ticketmaster we wake up every day obsessing over the fan experience. We think this change is a big step toward creating pricing transparency that is good for fans, and thus good for business.

Kudos, MotN.  I look forward to seeing how you will continue to think of the consumer first, and market cap second.

Now, the only other thing that Nathan has to learn right now is that a blog needs to be updated more than once every week.

Come on.  You’ve got googles of stuff to talk about.  Give us some regular content, already?

It’s not that hard.

To read the full Ticketmaster statement on their Ticketology blog, click here.

Are they playing hockey in hell?

Something froze over last week.

The primary and secondary markets started working together.

As reported in Ticket News, LiveNation, an official promoter of concerts and an official pusher of the tickets for those concerts, started listing brokers on their ticketing site as another option for tickets to their events.

For an example, click here to see the event page for the upcoming Jay-Z concert at the Izod Center in East Rutherford, NJ.  (And make sure you click on the “Search Tickets” button because the interface is awesome).

It’s an admission to the public that the secondary market exists, and that it may be able to provide something that the primary market can’t.

And it’s a way for LiveNation to provide customers with all of the options, under their own umbrella.

Oh, and it’s surely a way for LiveNation to make some extra bank, because you know those brokers are paying them big time.

It reminds me of Amazon.com listing secondary sellers of books, etc., even when they have the items in stock.

We talked about the primary and secondary shaking hands before.

It looks like the partnerships have begun in other live entertainment industries.

Is ours next?

It should be.

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