The “Will It Recoup” winner announced! Did you win a Kindle?

Last Sunday saw the closing of Lend Me A Tenor, our last hold-out of the limited-run plays from this Spring season.

Sadly, my sources tell me that Tenor didn’t manage to turn to profit.

The only good news is now that we know, we can finally crown the winner of this year’s Will It Recoup!  (If you’re new to the blog and don’t know what-the-fiduciary-responsibility we’re talking about, click here for the original post.)

Someone is taking home a Kindle.  Is it you?

Here’s how the final profitability tally looks:

A View from the Bridge: RECOUPED!
The Miracle Worker: Did NOT recoup.
A Behanding in Spokane: Did NOT recoup.
Next Fall: Did NOT recoup.
Looped: Did NOT recoup.
Red: RECOUPED!
Lend Me A Tenor: Did NOT recoup.
Fences: RECOUPED!
Enron:  Did NOT recoup.

THREE winners in the bunch out of nine entries!  A 33% success rate this Spring!

Who says Broadway is a risky place?  You just gotta know how to pick ’em right?

And you certainly do.

A total of NINE of you scored a 100% in this year’s contest (boy, would you made some bank if this wasn’t a virtual-investment game).

The winner of the Kindle can down to the tiebreaker question:  Which of these shows would win the most Tony Awards?  (Answer:  Red)  After adding that criteria, the nine were cut down to a field of TWO.

So, we’re going to pull a Solomon and cut the Kindle in half to see who really wants it.

Naaaaah.  We’re going to give away TWO!

Congrats to Howard and Zach on their play.jpgckin’ prowess!  You’ve both won a Kindle!

Look for an email from me with details.

And for the rest of you . . . well, there’s always next year.  Picking winners isn’t a one season game.  There’s always another year . . . whether you’re playing a game, or producing for reals, yo.

A Will It Recoup Update. How is Broadway doing this Spring?

You forgot about this contest, didn’t you?

Back in February, we launched our second ‘Will It Recoup’ fantasy Broadway investment game and put a Kindle on the line.

The name of the game says it all (just like the name of your show should reflect exactly what your show is about).  It’s your job to pick the winners from the floppers in the Spring season.

So how are you (and the Broadway Producers) doing so far?

Here’s what we know and what we don’t:

A View from the Bridge: RECOUPED!
The Miracle Worker: Did NOT recoup.
A Behanding in Spokane: Did NOT recoup.
Next Fall: Did NOT recoup.
Looped: Did NOT recoup.
Red: RECOUPED!
Lend Me A Tenor: Too soon to tell.
Fences: RECOUPED!
Enron:  Did NOT recoup.

So that makes a total of 3 Broadway shows out of 9 that have recouped already. That’s a pretty bountiful Spring, considering the statistical average is 1 out of 5 (although it is certainly not a coinky-dink that two of the three shows that have recouped featured Hollywood mega-stars Denzel Washington and Scarlett Johansson).

Still, the game is not over.  We’ve still got one show on the fence.  We could have quite a good year if it falls into the win column.

How are you doing?

Well, there are 27 of you who picked those three shows to recoup, and the five shows that did not.  27 of you are still in the money!

So…it all comes down to Lend Me a Tenor.

See you in August!

10 Questions for a Broadway Pro. Volume 2: A Marketing Director

I got some great response from the first edition of 10 Qs for a Bway Pro, so I thought I’d roll out Volume 2 this week.

Last week we talked about advertising . . . this week, we explore the more ambiguous world of marketing with none other than that Broadway Marketing Guru, Hugh Hysell.

I’ve worked on a bunch of shows with Hugh, from babies to biggies, and Hugh always brings the goods.  Why?  You’ve got to love what you do if you’re going to do a great job.  And if you spend five minutes with Hugh, you’ll realize that Hugh loves his job . . . and those fingerprints of love are all over every show he does, not matter how big or small.

Here are 10 Qs with Hugh!

1. What is your title?

I am President of HHC Marketing, a multi-division marketing and promotions company specializing in Broadway and Off-Broadway.  HHC’s divisions include full service marketing for Broadway and Off-Broadway Shows, BroadwayBox (running the advertising department for their sites including BroadwayBox.com, LunchTix.com and TicketsThisWeek), and TheMenEvent.com (the city’s largest Gay email list, which I use to promote my full service clients).  I am also President of Teams on Broadway (our Street Team Firm).  Often, in playbill listings, we are referred to simply as “Marketing” and many shows refer to me as their “Marketing Director.”

2. What show/shows are you currently working on?

On Broadway, HHC is working on Looped, Jersey Boys and Fela!.  Our Off-Broadway clients include The Temperamentals, John Tartaglia’s Imaginocean, The 39 Steps, Flying Karamazov Brothers’ 4Play, The Irish Curse, Looking for Billy Haines, Yank, Leslie Jordan’s My Trip Down the Pink CarpetSigns of Life, as well as some shows that have not been announced yet (sssshhhhh – I can’t tell you).  Teams on Broadway is currently providing the street teams for Fela!Memphis and The Miracle Worker.  Yes – we did the Princess Leia team for Wishful Drinking. 🙂

3. In one sentence, describe your job.

I run a very active marketing company that seeks out, negotiates and administers marketing programs for our clients, often without spending a dime.

4. What skills are necessary for a person in your position?

Creativity, people skills, charm, drive, follow-through, and strong attention to detail.  As a theatre marketer, as funds are usually quite low, one needs to be very creative and think out of the box.  Our goal is to form effective, attention-grabbing promotions that directly influence the ticket buyer.  You then have to charm promotional partners to help you make your plans come thru.  At the same time you have to be able to drive yourself to fully administer every minute detail of a promotion.  A marketer has to walk the line between being a creative artist, a charming pal, and an anal-retentive, highly-organized business person.

5. What kind of training did you go through to get to your position?

As my mother says, life provides you opportunities for your transferable skills.  I was trained as an actor (BFA UNC-Greensboro, MFA University of Florida).  My acting career was largely in touring theatre where I used my creative skills in the rehearsal process, and anal-retentive skills to keep the performances solid over months and months of doing the same show.  I think these skills have been very useful to me as a marketer.  After I left acting, I knew I wanted to enter the business world of theatre, so I became an intern at Richard Frankel Productions, where I moved up to be Associate General Manager of an Off-Broadway show, which then went on to tour and then on to play in Vegas.  At the same time, I was producing a show in the Fringe that did very well, and I moved it to an Off-Off Broadway venue for an extended run.  That run proved to be my true training to be a marketer.  I had no money to promote the show, but with the advice of a Broadway marketer, I did lots and lots of promotions (bookstore, internet, nightclub, bars, barter ads, etc).  The show stayed alive, and I recouped my investment.  The marketer who mentored me (Scott Walton) later  hired me, and together we grew his company, and in 2002 I bought him out.  I have never taken a marketing course, but I do teach it at Columbia.  Mom is very proud.

6. What was your first job in theater?

My first paid job was as an actor with the Kaleidoscope Theater out of Providence, RI.  We did summer tours of kids’ shows to the music tents in New England (Warwick Music Tent, South Shore Music Tent, etc.).  I played a cat in Pinocchio and the Genie in Aladdin (with a 12-year-old Joey Pizzi as Aladdin and Pinocchio).

7. Why do you think theater is important?

Theatre is adventure, escape, entertainment, enlightenment, education, magic, joy and sorrow all rolled up with beautiful images, soaring music and inspiring words  Life meets Art.  Love it.

8. What is your profession’s greatest challenge today?

Audience development.  The audience needs to grow (so there are more people to buy tickets).  With the arts being cut in education, we are not developing kids with art in their lives.  Without that exposure, how will they learn about art in themselves and thus appreciate the art of others?  We need theatre that cultivates new audiences, and allows them to discover the richness that theatre can provide.

9. If you could change just one thing about the industry with the wave of a magic wand, what would it be?

Make theatre cheaper to produce.

10. What advice would you give to someone who wanted to do what you do?

The word ‘marketing’ can mean so many things, and even in the industry that title can refer to different jobs depending if you are working in the commercial or not-for-profit sector.  I would suggest that an aspiring marketer first get an internship in NYC within a theatre marketing firm, press office, or general management office. Learn how shows are marketed and why those decisions are made.  Knowing the current environment allows you to help it grow and adapt to the ever-changing consumer environment.

What do you think will recoup this year? Survey results revealed!

Game on!

We had a record number of entries to this Spring’s “Will It Recoup” contest.  This year’s players included some of Broadway’s biggest players, as well as high school students, regional theater directors, folks from overseas and more.  It’s quite a collection of handicappers . . . but just like Nathan’s Famous Fourth of July Hot Dog Eating Contest, there can only be one winner.

Who will it be?

We’ve got some time before the Kindle winner is revealed, so until then I thought we’d take a look at what the majority of you thought.

Below are the results of how all of you voted on each show’s recoupment chances:

A View From The Bridge
87.9% It WILL recoup
12.1% It will NOT recoup

The Miracle Worker
44.3% It WILL recoup
55.7% It will NOT recoup

A Behanding in Spokane
36.6% It WILL recoup
63.4% It will NOT recoup

Next Fall
27.8% It WILL recoup
72.2% It will NOT recoup

Looped
20.8% It WILL recoup
79.2% It will NOT recoup

Red
24.3% It WILL recoup
75.7% It will NOT recoup

Lend Me A Tenor
49.3% It WILL recoup
50.7% It will NOT recoup

Fences
72.6% It WILL recoup
27.4% It will NOT recoup

Enron
46.5% It WILL recoup
53.5% It will NOT recoup

So, according to the majority of you, there will be TWO recoupers in this lot of nine, A View From The Bridge and Fences.  Those two winners would put us slightly ahead of our industry standard recoupment rate of 1 out of 5 shows.  Sounds like a safe, star-driven bet to me.

Then again, the majority picked 33 Variations to recoup last year, and thought that God of Carnage was going to be a financial bomb.  😉  Don’t feel so bad. I produced Oleanna this year, remember?

What do I think?  I think there’s a good shot at getting three shows into the black this Spring . . . which would put us at 3 out of 9.

And that’s a pretty dang good batting average for any business.

Stay tuned to the blog for updates as the season goes on, and good luck to all the players!

And even better luck to all the actual Producers.

Play “Will It Recoup” and win a Kindle!

Spring is in the air (sorta), which means it’s time to play . . . (say it with me like you’re the audience of a game show) . . . WILL . . . IT . . . RECOUP!

Last year was the first time we played this fantasy Broadway investment game, and I got a bunch of great feedback about it (especially from last year’s winner, Tom L., who walked away with an iPhone), so I thought we’d play with our imagined fortunes again!

This year, I’m not giving away an iPhone (and I won’t ever again, until they release us from the horror that is AT&T).  The grand prize for this season of Will It Recoup is my new favorite toy in my Producer’s Toolkit, a Kindle!

Here’s how the game works:

There are currently nine commercial plays set to open from Jan. 1st to this year’s Tony deadline.  Your job?  Pick the ones that will recoup.  That simple . . .or is it?

I’m not including any musicals, because it would just take too dang long to find out who won the Kindle (I can barely stand how long it takes to get through one American Idol season).  Most of the plays are limited runs, or what I call, the ol’ Broadway “Smash and Grab,” so we should know the results sometime this summer.

The plays are:

A View From The Bridge
The Miracle Worker
A Behanding in Spokane
Next Fall
Looped
Red
Lend Me A Tenor
Fences
Enron

And yep, one of the plays above has already opened, so you’ve got a gimme.  

To play, just click on the link below.  It’ll take you to a survey.  Pick the recoupers and you’re in!

A few important rules:

– All entrants must be email subscribers to the blog so I can validate your entry.  If you are not an email subscriber, please subscribe by putting your email in the box to the left of this entry.  The email you subscribe with must match the email you enter in the survey.  (People have lost prizes because of failing to make sure their emails match, so please take care with this one).
– Only one entry per reader
– Recoupment must occur during the Broadway run to count as a recouped show (in other words, subsidiary income doesn’t count).

Entries will only be accepted until 2/15 at 12:01 AM so enter today!

For additional info on the game, including some tips on how to win, check out last year’s description of the game here.     

Now let’s play . . . (one more time) . . . WILL . . . IT . . . RECOUP!

PLAY WILL IT RECOUP TODAY!  WIN A KINDLE!  CLICK HERE!   

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