Trend alert: Matinees aren’t just for Wednesdays anymore.

Telecharge.com recently sent out an email to its customers with a subject similar to the subject of this blog.

Why?

Because this summer, a bunch of shows are shaking up their schedules.

  • Baby It’s You has performances on Friday at 2 PM.
  • Chicago has performances on Thursday at 3 PM.
  • Rock of Ages has performances on Friday at 3 PM.
  • Mamma Mia has a couple of Friday performances at 2 PM.
  • (Book of Mormon had some Friday mats scheduled at one point, but has since reverted to a standard sched.)

So what’s with this new strategy?  Well, it’s the summer, so more tourists are roaming the streets of Times Square, and these shows are trying to go around their competition.  While the shows may not sell out at these “odd” times,” the theory is that there are people that want to see shows at alternative times.  And while there may be 30+ shows competing for an audience on a Friday night, there may less than a handful competing for that audience on a Friday mat.  And a show just might net higher than on a Tuesday or Wednesday night.

London has always offered earlier Friday performances, and I’ve been pitching a summer “Friday at 5” schedule for years.

Most of these shows will snap back to their regular schedule when September comes, and by then we’ll have some data on whether the experiment worked.

I’ll try to do some digging to see if I can get a source from one of these shows to share.

Whether or not they work, big kudos to the decision makers on these shows for giving it a shot.  It takes a lot to deviate from the norm, especially in this change-resistant industry.

But exploration like this is how we discover new ways of solving age-old problems.

 

(Got a comment?  I love ’em, so comment below!  Email subscribers, click here, then scroll down, to say what’s on your mind!)

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FUN STUFF

– 87 Days to Godspell!  Read the day-by-day account of producing Godspell on Broadway here.

– Win 2 tickets to The Voca PeopleClick here!

 

The 1st ever Crowd-Funded Broadway musical. And it’s got your name on it. (UPDATED 2019)

Yes, it’s true.  We’re doing it.

But before I go into the details, here’s the backstory.

The world of financing projects of all shapes and sizes has been changing at an alarming rate over the last decade.

Thanks to entrepreneurs like Guillaume Colboc and Benjamin Pommeraud, as well as my bloggin’ hero Seth Godin and his book Tribes, the guys at Kickstarter.org and, of course, the King of Crowd-Funding himself, Barack Obama, a new era in bringing people with a common vision together has been born.

We’ve even talked about it on this blog on several occasions . . . and we’ve even wondered, “Can we apply this to Broadway?”

Well, guess what?  We can.  It just took a few extra lawyers and a few extra hours to figure out a new way of doing things.  (I even had to pass a Series 63 Exam to become a Securities Agent!)

So, it is with great pleasure that I officially announce to all of you first, that my upcoming Broadway revival of Godspell will be the first-ever Crowd-Funded, or as I like to call it, “Community-Funded,” Broadway musical.

To be honest, I’ve had this idea for several years, but I was just waiting for the right show.  And Godspell is the perfect show for this concept.  As Stephen Schwartz said to me, “Godspell is essentially about a community of people coming together.”  It just makes sense to bring together the largest community of Producers ever to mount this historic 40th Anniversary production.

As you know, investing in a Broadway musical is something that is usually only available to a select group of people at very high investment thresholds.

But everywhere I go, I meet people who I know would love the opportunity to invest in a Broadway musical and become Broadway Producers themselves, despite the obvious risks, if they only knew how, and if only the entry point was more affordable.

Godspell is for all those people.

Traditionally, the price of one investing unit in a Broadway show has been as high as $10,000, $25,000 or even $100,000.

One unit in Godspell is only $100.  (FYI, there is a minimum purchase of 10 units per investor)

Now, in the subject of this post I said this show had your name on it.  Here’s how:

Each investor
in Godspell shall receive a limited liability company interest in The Godspell, LLC,
per our Offering Circular as qualified with the Securities and Exchange
Commission of the United States.*

In addition, every single investor, no matter how much he or she invests, will have his or her name listed on a poster outside of our Broadway theater.

Yep, you’re going to get billing.

And every single investor will also have their name listed on a new website created exclusively for this community, PeopleofGodspell.com, as well as his or her photo, hometown, a quote, and links to their Facebook and Twitter profiles. 

What do you think?  Fun, right?

There may even be opportunities for opening night performance and gala tickets, complimentary tickets to previews, invitations to private cast functions and more.

If you’re interested in joining me and the other members of the community in this incredibly unique and historic production, visit www.PeopleOfGodspell.com today or click here.  Please note, this is a limited offer because there is only a finite quantity of units available.  If you are interested, I encourage you to contact me through the link above as soon as possible.  I’ve announced it publicly here on my blog first, so that my readers could have the first opportunity to participate . . . after all, our conversations helped inspire it.

Click here to learn more about joining the community.  And maybe I’ll see you on opening night!

Oh, and yes, every investor gets one of the buttons in this photograph.

Join The People of Godspell today.  It’s the first-ever Community Produced Broadway Musical.

– – – – –

UPDATE:  This offering closed back in 2011.  Want to learn more about Broadway InvestingClick here to get the only book published on the subject, and learn it works, how to pick “winners,” how to avoid “losers,” and how to get started.

Should we have more than 4 nominees for Best Musical?

The Academy Awards went ol’ school this year when they went back to their roots of having 10 nominees for Best Picture, a practice that was discontinued sixty years ago.

Why’d they do it?

The President of the Academy, Sid Ganis, said, “Having 10 Best Picture nominees is going to allow Academy voters to recognize and include some of the fantastic movies that often show up in the other Oscar categories, but have been squeezed out of the race for the top prize.”

That’s certainly true, but there are other reasons for widening the field, including making the run for the gold more suspenseful (and making it more likely for an underdog to win) and giving more films additional marketing power.

So, should we do it?  Should the Tonys widen their field of Best Musical and Best Play nominees to five?

The answer is Yes.

Sometimes.

The Tony Committee should have the authority to widen their choice of Best Musical and Best Play nominees to more than four should they feel that the season demands it (especially since they nixed the Special Event Tony – where are all those folks gonna go?).  We’ve all seen snubs in the past four years that just didn’t make sense, and this would be a way to recognize shows on the fringe, give them the marketing power of the Tony Award (plus the performance on the telecast – which is what the audience tunes in for), and make it more of a nail-biter of a race.

Awards are about two things: recognizing excellence, and marketing the industry that they are awarding.

Right now, we’re not taking full enough advantage of either.

Ken Davenport
Ken Davenport

Tony Award-Winning Broadway Producer

I'm on a mission to help 5000 shows get produced by 2025.

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