Look Ma! We made an iPhone app called “At The Booth!”

I feel like a proud papa sending out a birth announcement.  And while the gestation of this offspring didn’t take nine months, at times it sure felt like it!  (Then again, I’m about as patient as a kid on Christmas Eve.)

On January 26th, I wrote a blog about the Top 10 Broadway and Theater iPhone apps, only to find out that there weren’t even 10 to choose from.

So, my staff and I hit the whiteboard and came up with some ideas, and I also put a call out to all of you for your ideas, and said that if I found one that we liked, we’d make it . . . and share the profits.

Well, lo and behold, my staff . . . and several of you (you know who you are) . . . expressed interest in an iPhone app that tells you what’s available at the TKTS® booth, and at what price, etc.

So, we made it!

Introducing . . . The At The Boothapp, your guide to what’s half-price on Broadway today!  Download it now!

 

At The Boothincludes:

 

  • A list of all the shows available at the TKTS® booth and at what price (both in dollars and percent off – 50%, 40%, etc) updated throughout the day!
  • A “line indicator” that tells you how long the line is!
  • A full directory of all the shows on Broadway and Off-Broadway, whether they are at The Booth or not, including cast lists, photos, videos, and more!
  • A full directory of all of the theaters in NYC, including maps!
  • Links to reviews of all the shows!
  • Links to full price tickets and discount tickets, just in case your show isn’t at the booth!
  • And more!

The app has been on soft-launch for a couple of weeks, and we’ve gotten great feedback already.  We gave a few away to some folks in Times Square and here’s what they had to say . . .

“This is exactly what I was looking for.  It helped me plan my day better and I knew I was going to save money.” – Karen, Texas

“If I can find out in advance that a show is available, I’ll come to TKTS® more often, because I know my trip down won’t be wasted.” – Tom, NYC

So, if you’ve ever wanted to know what was up at the booth before you got in line (or even while you’re in line), download the app today.  It’s a must-have for any savvy Broadway and Off-Broadway theatergoer.

Get it here.

Special thanks to my staff, especially Melissa and Blair, who supervised the development, and special thanks to all of you who submitted your fantastic ideas for all different types of apps.  You helped inspire us to make something where there was nothing before.  Now, if you’ve got another idea for an app (or a dog food, a book, and hey, even a musical), go make it.  It ain’t brain surgery.

(And while you’re downloading apps, don’t forget you can get my blog in app form as well.  Get The Producer’s Perspective blog app here.  I’m funnier on an iPhone. Really.  It’s true.  If you were reading this on your phone, you would have laughed . . . a lot.)

Theater things that don’t make sense: Vol. 8

I was recently at a big ol’ touring house outside of NYC.  You know, one of those theaters in major metro areas all over the country that presents big national tours like Billy Elliot and Mary Poppins as well as concerts, lectures, local dance recitals and more.

I was talking to the TD of this theater, and he was telling me about his house plot.  You know, the bank of lighting instruments owned by the theater that can be used for small shows, or used to augment big shows, etc. (which allows touring shows to travel with less, saving them money in rentals and trucking and load-in time).  A house plot is one of the reasons that Altar Boyz was able to tour all over the country.

So I started thinking . . .

Why don’t Broadway houses have house plots?

If there were a string of basic instruments in each house, we could save time, money, and I’d bet a lot of those dark weeks that some theaters face could be filled by smaller shows or special events that wouldn’t normally be able to get their shows up without this savings . . . which would provide more jobs for everyone.  (The owners of New World Stages recently added a house plot to one of their small theaters, and it’s been booked more often because of it).

The theater owners could even charge a few more bucks for use of the package, paying for (and profiting from) their initial purchase of the equipment.

It’s my understanding that the current stagehand contract prevents leaving elements from one show to be used for another show without payment (since the guys are losing hours of work). While that argument seems to be another ‘theater thing that doesn’t make sense,’ I would think that a compromise could be had, since this “house plot” idea is in use all over the country, and since the existence of the plot could generate more gigs for the stagehands in the future.

With our costs escalating just about everywhere, we’ve got to look at ways to become more efficient . . . which means looking at things in ways we’ve never looked at them before.

Ken Davenport
Ken Davenport

Tony Award-Winning Broadway Producer

I'm on a mission to help 5000 shows get produced by 2025.

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